A comedian tells a story about terrorism that no one should laugh at. His audience passed the test.
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It's not easy to pull off jokes about terrorism, but comedian Sean Devlin knows what he's doing.

We hear the word "terrorism" in bouts of media hysteria — usually about Muslims — a lot more than any of us would prefer these days.

Devlin, who lives in Vancouver, was watching the news one day when he saw a reporter raise a simple but important question. The reporter asked politician Peter McKay, Canada's former defense minister, how the government defined terrorism.


The minister's curt reply: "Look it up."

(That's Madonna, not Peter McKay.)

Devlin took it upon himself to find out.

He felt a little hung up on the words "unauthorized or unofficial."

(Cue laugh track.)

Still unsatisfied, he kept digging for more and found a report released by the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (Canada's CIA) that lays out all the groups they see as a threat to national security.

Devlin was shocked to see one group in particular that was dismissed as a threat: white supremacist and neo-Nazi groups.

According to the report (which you can read in full if you like), the explicitly racist groups “do not overly propose serious acts of violence."

Devlin goes on to recount one of several horrifying stories that occurred since that report was written. The short of it is that two white supremacists allegedly set a Filipino man on fire ... just because. To which he makes a great point:

The video closes with with a seemingly contradictory finding from the Canadian spy agency's documents — that "lone wolf" acts of terror are more common among white supremacist and right-wing extremist groups than radical Islamist groups.

So what's up with all the Islamophobic, terror hysteria spread by the government and media?

Devlin's comedy troop, Shit Harper Did, is exploring this topic and a bunch of other important issues in a new documentary called "Pull the Rug." Check out their website for it if it interests you.

via Jimivr / Flickr and Gage Skidmore / Flickr

Actress Billie Lourd paid tribute to her late mother Carrie Fisher on Tuesday by sharing a photo of her son Kingston watching Fisher as Princess Leia in 1977's "Star Wars: A New Hope."

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Courtesy of CeraVe
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"I love being a nurse because I have the honor of connecting with my patients during some of their best and some of their worst days and making a difference in their lives is among the most rewarding things that I can do in my own life" - Tenesia Richards, RN

From ushering new life into the world to holding the hand of a patient as they take their last breath, nurses are everyday heroes that deserve our respect and appreciation.

To give back to this community that is always giving so selflessly to others, CeraVe® put out a call to nurses to share their stories for a chance to be featured in Heroes Behind the Masks, a digital content series shining a light on nurses who go above and beyond to provide safe and quality care to patients and their communities.

First up: Tenesia Richards, a labor and delivery nurse working in New York City who, in addition to her regular job, started a community outreach program in a homeless shelter that houses expectant mothers for up to one year postpartum.

Tenesia | Heroes Behind the Masks presented by CeraVe www.youtube.com

Upon learning at a conference that black mothers in the U.S. die at three to four times the rate of white mothers, one of the widest of all racial disparities in women's health, Richards decided to take further action to help her community. She, along with a handful of fellow nurses, volunteered to provide antepartum, childbirth and postpartum education to the women living at the shelter. Additionally, they looked for other ways to boost the spirits of the residents, like throwing baby showers and bringing in guest speakers. When COVID-19 hit and in-person gatherings were no longer possible, Richards and her team found creative workarounds and created holiday care packages for the mothers instead.

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