A college student wants to tackle one of the most pressing issues of our time.
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Taco Bell Live Más

For most people, addressing climate change can feel hopeless. It's too big, too complex, and relies on too many moving parts.

But one teen is undaunted. When he looks at climate change, he sees an opportunity. This is his story.

Saving the world isn't easy, but this teen may be able to do just that.


Posted by Upworthy on Thursday, September 22, 2016

Manny grew up in Miami, the son of Cuban immigrants who wanted to give their family the best chance at life.

From an early age, they let him know that he was capable of anything he set his mind to as long as he worked hard and devoted himself to his goals.

He took their lesson to heart.

Manny is determined to do something many of us find it easier to ignore: He wants to combat climate change.

Most of his peers agree that many of the effects of climate change can be averted.

But he's one of the few who is ready to devote his life to tackling the challenge.

He says, "environmental science is the science of the future" because he truly believes that we're capable of making a difference now before it's too late.

He knows the road isn't going to be easy. But he feels a strong sense of urgency.

"Is saving the world easy? It's kind of not. But it's a small price to pay to hopefully make a really big difference for everyone."

With the help of the Live Más scholarship from Taco Bell, Manny now attends MIT, and his continued success will benefit us all. Students like Manny are literally our future. They're capable of changing the world when we give them the support they need to realize their dreams.

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$200 billion of COVID-19 recovery funding is being used to bail out fossil fuel companies. These mayors are combatting this and instead investing in green jobs and a just recovery.

Learn more on how cities are taking action: c40.org/divest-invest


Photo by Nick Fewings on Unsplash

Last year, we shared the sad impact that plastic pollution has had on some of our planet's most beautiful places. With recycling not turning out to be the savior it was made out to be, solutions to our growing plastic problem can seem distant and complex.

We have seen some glimmers of hope from both human innovation and nature itself, however. In 2016, a bacteria that evolved with the ability to break down plastic was discovered in a Japanese waste site. Two years later, scientists managed to engineer the mutant plastic-eating enzyme they called PETase—named for polyethylene terephthalate, the most common plastic found in bottles and food packaging—in a lab.

Here's an explainer of how those enzymes work:

Ending Plastic Pollution with Designer Bacteria youtu.be

Now researchers have revealed another game-changer in the plastic-eater—a super-enzyme that can break down plastic six times faster than PETase alone.

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$200 billion of COVID-19 recovery funding is being used to bail out fossil fuel companies. These mayors are combatting this and instead investing in green jobs and a just recovery.

Learn more on how cities are taking action: c40.org/divest-invest


Former CBS News anchor Dan Rather has become a beloved voice of reason, knowledge, and experience for many Americans on social media the past few years. At 88, Rather has seen more than most of us, and as a journalist, he's had a front row seat as modern history has played out. He combines that lifetime of experience and perspective with an eloquence that hearkens to a time when eloquence mattered, he called us to our common American ideals with his book "What Unites Us," and he comforts many of is with his repeated message to stay "steady" through the turmoil the U.S. has been experiencing.

All of that is to say, when Dan Rather sounds the alarm, you know we've reached a critical historical moment.

Yesterday, President Trump again refused to commit to a peaceful transfer of power after the election when directly asked if he would—yet another democratic norm being toppled. Afterward, Rather posted the following words of wisdom—and warning—to his nearly three million Facebook fans:


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via DanielandDavid2 / Instagram

Editor's Note: We used "black" in lowercase for our headline and the body of this story in accordance with emerging guidelines from the Associated Press and other trusted news outlets who are using uppercase "Black" in reference to American descendants of the diaspora of individuals forcibly brought from Africa as slaves. As part of our ongoing efforts to be transparent and communicate choices with our readership, we've included this note for clarity. The original story begins below.

On February 26, 2019, Stacy and Babajide Omirin of Lagos, Nigeria got quite the shock. When Stacy delivered identical twins through C-section one came out black and the other, white.

The parents knew they were having identical twins and expected them to look exactly the same. But one has a white-looking complexion and golden, wavy hair.

"It was a massive surprise," Stacy told The Daily Mail. "Daniel came first, and then the nurse said the second baby has golden hair. I thought how can this be possible. I looked down and saw David, he was completely white."

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