A breastfeeding mom was asked to cover up. Her response was perfect.

Stop me if you've heard this one before...

A new mom goes about her daily business, stops to breastfeed her infant child, and gets promptly shamed for it. Sound familiar?

These stories pop up every so often, and they never get any less frustrating to hear. One of the latest incident involves Avery Lane, a woman living on a military post who was asked to cover up while breastfeeding her 2-month-old child at a local H&R Block location.


So I was breastfeeding my 2 month old at a H&R Block on a military post when the manager asked me "Can you cover up with...

Posted by Avery Lane on Friday, April 21, 2017

The manager asked Lane to cover up with a towel. In response, she offered a blanket to cover his face if he really didn't want to see what was going on.

"[The H&R Block manager] asked me to leave since he was helping my friend and not me. So I then called the Military Police so they could come and inform him of them," Lane wrote on Facebook. "I'm glad they came and informed him that he could not tell me to leave."

But really, are we still doing this? "Cover up?" C'mon, would you want to have to eat with a blanket over your head? I'm going to guess you'd rather not. Would you want to have to eat lunch in a bathroom stall? Again, I'm just going to assume you don't. So why would you make a baby do it?

Let this little dude eat in peace, all right? Picture by Avery and Robert/YouTube.

Lane doesn't want the offending H&R manager to be fired. But she's also not going to use a cover in the future either — nor should she have to.

"There's no need for him to be fired because of that," Lane explains in a YouTube video addressing some frequently asked questions that have come up since her Facebook post went viral. She just wanted the manager to be educated on the topic of public breastfeeding, and now he is.

Now let's hope the rest of the world can get on board so we don't have to hear any more stories about moms being shamed for breastfeeding. It's not a big deal unless people make it one.

Let's all just agree to let moms be moms, and let babies eat in peace.

Deal? Deal.

Check out the videos over on Avery's YouTube page to hear more about the situation at H&R Block and get some general info on breastfeeding.

Image by 5540867 from Pixabay

Figuring out what to do for a mom on Mother's Day can be a tricky thing. There's the standard flowers or candy, of course, and taking her out to a nice brunch is a fairly universal winner. But what do moms really want?

Speaking from experience—my kids range from age 12 to 20—a lot depends on the stage of motherhood. What I wanted when my kids were little is different than what I want now, and I'm sure when my kids are grown and gone I'll want something different again.

We asked our readers to share what they want for Mother's Day, and while the answers were varied, there were some common themes that emerged.

Moms of young kids want a break.

When your kids are little, motherhood is relentless. Precious and adorable, yes. Wonderful and rewarding, absolutely. But it's a LOT. And it's a lot all the fricking time.

Most moms I know would love the gift of alone time, either away at a hotel or Airbnb or in their own home with no one else around. Time alone is a priceless commodity at this stage, especially if it comes with someone else taking care of cleaning, making sure the kids are fed and safe and occupied, doing the laundry, etc.

This is especially true after more than a year of pandemic living, where we moms have spent more time than usual at home with our offspring. While in some ways that's been great, again, it's a lot.

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Courtesy of CeraVe
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"I love being a nurse because I have the honor of connecting with my patients during some of their best and some of their worst days and making a difference in their lives is among the most rewarding things that I can do in my own life" - Tenesia Richards, RN

From ushering new life into the world to holding the hand of a patient as they take their last breath, nurses are everyday heroes that deserve our respect and appreciation.

To give back to this community that is always giving so selflessly to others, CeraVe® put out a call to nurses to share their stories for a chance to be featured in Heroes Behind the Masks, a digital content series shining a light on nurses who go above and beyond to provide safe and quality care to patients and their communities.

First up: Tenesia Richards, a labor and delivery nurse working in New York City who, in addition to her regular job, started a community outreach program in a homeless shelter that houses expectant mothers for up to one year postpartum.

Tenesia | Heroes Behind the Masks presented by CeraVe www.youtube.com

Upon learning at a conference that black mothers in the U.S. die at three to four times the rate of white mothers, one of the widest of all racial disparities in women's health, Richards decided to take further action to help her community. She, along with a handful of fellow nurses, volunteered to provide antepartum, childbirth and postpartum education to the women living at the shelter. Additionally, they looked for other ways to boost the spirits of the residents, like throwing baby showers and bringing in guest speakers. When COVID-19 hit and in-person gatherings were no longer possible, Richards and her team found creative workarounds and created holiday care packages for the mothers instead.

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