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Unilever and the United Nations
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2014 — the HOTTEST YEAR YET.

Well, SO WHAT?

Here are five not-so-great things we need to get ready for in a warming world:

1. DROUGHT

This won't be news to you, but it's DRY in the west. California has had some rain, but the big dry ain't over yet. And look at the huge areas of the southwest in a "severe" or "extreme" drought.


This means higher fruit and vegetable prices for you and me, no matter where we live. The cost of the drought to California was recently pegged at $2.2 billion, with 17,100 jobs lost statewide.

2. FIRE

7 million to 9 million acres burn each year in the United States (globally it's like 865 million acres). The cost of wildfires every year? $125 billion. But climate change could add as much as $60 billion to the bill by 2050. Ouch.

3. STORMS

Storms with very heavy rainfall have increased a lot since 1958.

Both big storms...

and small ones.

And, of course, a lot of rain in a very short time — especially on land that has been in drought — can bring...

4. FLOODING

Like this:

and this:


Flooding will be worse along the coasts because of sea level rise. About 2.6% of the global population (about 177 million people) will be living in a place at risk of regular flooding. Across the globe, that means about 1 person in 40 live in places likely to be exposed to such flooding by the end of the century.

5. POWER OUTAGES

Bad weather can really mess with the power grid. Check out the increase in major blackouts since 2000:

This is just part of what climate change looks like. Are we all ready? You can explore more at "States of Change," where Climate Central has compiled stories, research, and data about what climate change looks like when it hits the ground.

A breastfeeding mother's experience at Vienna's Schoenbrunn Zoo is touching people's hearts—but not without a fair amount of controversy.

Gemma Copeland shared her story on Facebook, which was then picked up by the Facebook page Boobie Babies. Photos show the mom breastfeeding her baby next to the window of the zoo's orangutan habitat, with a female orangutan sitting close to the glass, gazing at them.

"Today I got feeding support from the most unlikely of places, the most surreal moment of my life that had me in tears," Copeland wrote.

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Family

Mom does a great job fielding her adorable 3-year-old's questions about pregnancy

'Did you open your tummy and then then the baby got in there?'

via TikTok

Blakely learns she's going to be a big sister again.

“The talk” is a moment a lot of parents dread having with their children. Sex is a complicated issue so it’s understandable that parents feel uncomfortable breaching that boundary with their kids and explaining such a delicate topic.

Kadyn Smith, a mom in California, got more than 2.5 million views of a video she posted on TikTok because of her incredible ability to navigate the topic with her 3-year-old daughter, Blakely. Smith told Blakely she was going to be a big sister for the second time and recorded the conversation to post on social media.

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She's enjoying the big benefits of some simple life hacks.

James Clear’s landmark book “Atomic Habits: An Easy & Proven Way to Build Good Habits & Break Bad Ones” has sold more than 9 million copies worldwide. The book is incredibly popular because it has a simple message that can help everyone. We can develop habits that increase our productivity and success by making small changes to our daily routines.

"It is so easy to overestimate the importance of one defining moment and underestimate the value of making small improvements on a daily basis,” James Clear writes. “It is only when looking back 2 or 5 or 10 years later that the value of good habits and the cost of bad ones becomes strikingly apparent.”

His work proves that we don’t need to move mountains to improve ourselves, just get 1% better every day.

Most of us are reluctant to change because breaking old habits and starting new ones can be hard. However, there are a lot of incredibly easy habits we can develop that can add up to monumental changes.

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