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7 ways to practice asking for consent when you connect with someone. None of them are awkward.

Maybe you've seen the comic explaining what consent ISN'T. Here's what it IS.

7 ways to practice asking for consent when you connect with someone. None of them are awkward.

Consent is a good thing.

What is it, exactly?

It's the act of specifically saying "yes" to sexual relations while unimpaired enough by drugs or alcohol to do so.


If you've seen the comic strip about consent Upworthy recently published, you probably pumped your fist with righteous delight that someone figured out how to make absolutely clear the case for consent.

But then maybe you wondered, "But how does a person go about asking for consent?"

At least some Upworthy readers did. Here's what a couple of them suggested.

Ask and ye shall receive, you sharp, inquisitive, consent-championing readers!

GIF from "Parks and Recreation."

This guy has seven surefire ways to work consent into your mojo.

And if you just can't watch this right now, OK.

Instead, here's the advice one woman (ahem! me) gave her son in a letter -- and it's applicable to sexual relations between any combination of genders:

"Check in with her! 'Do you want to be doing this?' is a great thing to ask when things are going to another sexual level. The worst thing that will happen is she'll rethink it and say, no, she's actually not ready. It's important at that point to pivot to doing something else together, and not make her feel guilty for changing her mind. While that may feel like a bummer to you in the moment, what you've just achieved there is fucking badass. You've just put someone else's feelings ahead of your physiological desires. You've just treated somebody the way you hope another guy would treat your sister."

See? Consent is really just Decent Person 101 kind of stuff. You've got this.

If you know a person who needs to think about this, pass it on!

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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.