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Joy

10 things that made us smile this week

Enjoy these humans being awesome and excellent to one another.

uplifting, joy, smiles

Upworthy's weekly roundup of joy.

Mark your calendars, folks, because today is an Upworthy "10 things that made us smile this week" first.

For the past year, we've been sharing these weekly roundups of joy and delight from around the internet. And inevitably—because they are such obvious sources of joy and delight—animals have featured prominently in these posts. Who can resist a hilariously adorable doggo video, right? I mean, it's an easy win. Smiles for days.

But this week, for the first time, all 10 posts are all about us. Just us humans. People being awesome and excellent to one another. Truly the best of humanity.


Don't worry, I'm 100% sure that our animal friends will make a comeback next week. (In fact, I'll make sure of it.) But the fact that there were too many people being too amazing to squeeze in any cute pets or funny wildlife videos this time around gives me hope. There's a lot of dark stuff happening out there, but there are also beacons of light all around us to remind us that people are all right.

So without further ado, enjoy this week's collection of fabulous humans.

1. Check out Scarlett rocking her first inclusive playground experience.

@kelsey___ward

#inclusiveplayground #inclusionmatters #disabilityawareness #mobilityaid #accesabilityforall #gaittrainer #medicalmom #nevergiveup #disabilitytiktok #disabilityaccessability #specialneedsfamily #smobraces #crocodilewalker #MakeASplash

The way her brothers are so excited to play with her on all the equipment and how thrilled she is to be able to enjoy the playground fully. So awesome.

2. Pottery artist leaves gorgeous "free art" in random places for people to find and keep.

Kim Press of Sailing Adrift Studios does "art drops" where she leaves a piece of handmade pottery someplace she visits, then shares the stories of the people who find them on her website. Imagine the joy of stumbling across one of these in your travels! Read the full story here.

3. A mom in Ukraine got her son to flee by telling him they were going to meet John Cena. Then Cena made it happen.

John Cena meets teen who fled Ukraine

Misha has Down Syndrome and had a hard time understanding why his family had to flee Mariupol when their home was destroyed in the Russian invasion. His mom made up a story about meeting his hero, John Cena, to keep him motivated on their long journey to safety. Cena saw their story and made it actually happen. Such a big heart. Read the full story here.

4. This grandpa saved his grandkid's Playmobil characters exactly as they put them to bed when they were 6.

Grandpas are the best. What a wonderful find.

5. The smooth moves of Norah, Yarah and Rosa could make anybody want to get up and dance.

I'd probably hurt myself trying to dance like they do, but it sure is fun to watch. That slo-mo part? So good.

6. A guy caught a baseball in the stands, then gave it to a kid. The kid returned the favor a few innings later.

See? People being excellent to one another. Love to see it.

7. News anchor donates his epic tie collection to younger professionals just starting out.

Tim Pham accidentally created his own charity with his massive tie collection, paying his success forward to up-and-coming professionals who need a tie. I mean, "Phamily Ties"? Amazing. Read the full story here.

8. These brothers saying goodbye to the youngest brother's crib is peak sibling sweetness.

The way they articulate their compassion for one another. And this: "When I always go in to check on him when he's still asleep, it's gorgeous." OH MY HEART. The brotherly love is too much.

9. That time Mr. Rogers got pranked by his cast and crew and his reaction was perfectly him.

This world desperately misses everything about Mr. Rogers. That is all.

10. Finally, this guy's Moana dance is just … LOL.

@real_madara_dusal

#moana #dancechallenge

His face. His timing. How much rehearsing did he have to do? I love that people are like this.

Hope that gave you a little jolt of joy and hope for humanity. Come back next week for another roundup of awesome people—and yes, adorable animals as well.

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