Why one mom left a pile of clean diapers and wipes in a HomeGoods bathroom.

When Christina Causland stopped in a bathroom at the HomeGoods in Solana Beach, California, she found an unexpected surprise: a pile of diapers.

Unused, luckily. Sitting atop the small pile of wipes and diapers was a small note. It read:

"I once found myself in this exact same spot with a newborn with a crazy blowout and NO DIAPERS or WIPES. An unmitigated disaster, that was! Just in case you have found yourself in the same sort of pickle, I brought in some wipes and diapers to save the day. Good luck out there! Happy Holidays! —Sarah"

I don't know you Sarah, but you're a gem! #gooddeeds #upworthy #HomeGoods #mademyday


A photo posted by ✌️😆🐞 (@xtina_cauz) on

Christina doesn't have any kids of her own, but she was so touched by this stranger's act of kindness that she decided to share it on Instagram.

"I can definitely relate to being in a pinch and not having what I needed," she explains in an e-mail. "I mostly just wanted to highlight her good deed and pass it along in hopes it would inspire others to do so."

We've all found ourselves in similar situations. Maybe instead of missing a diaper, you were a dollar short in the checkout line at the grocery store or maybe you had car trouble away from home with no one around to help. No matter what the case, we all know what it's like being in unfortunate and embarrassing situations — and how grateful we feel when a complete stranger comes to the rescue.

Sometimes you just need a little help. Photo by iStock.

Little things like stocking a store restroom with some emergency diapers can make a big difference in people's lives. During the holiday season, it's a great time to reflect on what our own contributions to the world can be.

As the saying goes, not all heroes wear capes. To a frustrated mom in an unenviable situation, Sarah came to the rescue. The same thing can be seen in the world all around us, from the Philadelphia restaurant known for its "pay-it-forward" approach to pizza to the stranger who picked up the tab for a Texan's auto repairs to people just doing their best to make positivity contagious.

Sure, there are a lot of bad things out there, a lot of negativity that permeates society. But if there's one thing that can warm the heart of cynics everywhere, it's knowledge that the world is filled with small-scale superheroes — we just have to look for them. And if we can't find them, we should do our best to be them.

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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.