The Women's March. Photo by Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/Getty Images.

The list of groups lining up to protest the Trump administration's policy agenda just keeps growing. Women. Immigrants and their advocates. LGBTQ Americans and their allies. Yemeni deli owners. Disabled Medicaid recipients.

And now ... dinosaurs.


On Wednesday, a large group of T. rexes — seriously, not making this up — marched on Washington to demand Congress overrule the president and continue funding national service programs.

A press release described the protest as featuring a "record number of dinosaurs," a probably technically correct statement that, nonetheless, doesn't really do the actual event justice.

Take a look:

"While dinosaurs are fun — national service extinction is a serious matter," Shirley Sagawa, CEO of Service Year Alliance, the group that organized the dino-march, said in an emailed statement.

Trump's proposed fiscal year 2018 budget would dramatically cut funding to a variety of long-standing aid organizations. Under the proposal, AmeriCorps, Senior Corps, and Vista would be eliminated. The Peace Corps would also see its funding slashed.

Eliminating these programs could cause a lot of harm to human beings. The Peace Corps operates in over 60 countries on six continents.  According to AmeriCorps, the program's volunteers assisted in over 21,000 sites last year, responding to natural disasters, providing free tax preparation assistance to senior citizens, and teaching anti-drug classes in schools where opioid abuse is rampant.

Despite their passionate embrace of the cause, it is unlikely dinosaurs would be affected by the cuts (though the humans inside the inflatable suits certainly might be).

Sagawa hopes the protest will convince the Senate to reduce or eliminate the cuts when they consider the budget this month.

Photo by Nicholas Kamm/Getty Images.

"We encourage them to listen to the folks who gathered outside the Capitol and expand national service instead of letting it go extinct," she said.

If dozens of hulking, bloodthirsty carnivores can't make the case, it's likely no one can.

Correction 9/1/2017: The article misstated the name of the group that organized the protest. It is Service Year Alliance, not National Service Alliance.

Photo by CDC on Unsplash

When schools closed early in the spring, the entire country was thrown for a loop. Parents had to figure out what to do with their kids. Teachers had to figure out how to teach students at home. Kids had to figure out how to navigate a totally new routine that was being created and altered in real time.

For many families, it was a big honking mess—one that many really don't want to repeat in the fall.

But at the same time, the U.S. hasn't gotten a handle on the coronavirus pandemic. As states have begun reopening—several of them too early, according to public health officials—COVID-19 cases have risen to the point where we now have more cases per day than we did during the height of the outbreak in the spring. And yet President Trump is making a huge push to get schools to reopen fully in the fall, even threatening to possibly remove funding if they don't.

It's worth pointing out that Denmark and Norway had 10 and 11 new cases yesterday. Sweden and Germany had around 300 each. The U.S. had 55,000. (And no, that's not because we're testing thousands of times more people than those countries are.)

The president of the country's largest teacher's union had something to say about Trump's push to reopen schools. Lily Eskelsen Garcia says that schools do need to reopen, but they need to be able to reopen safely—with measures that will help keep both students and teachers from spreading the virus and making the pandemic worse. (Trump has also criticized the CDCs "very tough & expensive guidelines" for reopening schools.)

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