The wonderful reason this rocker's driving trans people to and from their surgeries.

When Lynn Breedlove started giving rides to LGBTQ people, he heard some disturbing stories about what they'd experienced in regular cabs.

"They would tell me all these stories," he explains. "They had gotten kicked out of cabs. They have been misgendered in cabs. They have been raped by cab drivers."

Many more experienced the drive-by — when a driver would see them and refuse to stop.


We've all had our share of uncomfortable cab or ride-hailing moments, but the LGBTQ community experiences them much more frequently and on a whole other level.

Breedlove knew he had to do something to help these people feel safe going from A to B, so he started a volunteer ride service called Homobiles.

Breedlove at the wheel. Photo by Upworthy/Eagle Rare.

Homobiles is a donation-based safe ride organization in the San Francisco Bay Area that specifically caters to members of the LGBTQ community. Not only does it provide safe, reliable transportation, but no one is ever turned away because they can't afford to donate.

And Breedlove doesn't stop there. He also takes folks who are transitioning to and from their gender confirmation surgeries and related appointments.

There can be some trauma involved when going through such transformative life events, so Breedlove wants to make the trip there and back as painless and emotionally supportive as possible.

Lynn driving for Homobiles. Photo courtesy of Lynn Breedlove.

"To get a person to and from that moment in their lives where everything changes — it's such an honor."

As a transgender man himself, Breedlove's no stranger to judgement from ignorant people. So his mission to offer safe transport isn't just magnanimous — it's personal.

"I did not value myself because the whole message from the world was, 'Intrinsically, there's something really wrong with you,'" he says.

However, after fully immersing himself in the LGBTQ community, he's embraced who he really is — a punk rocker dude who loves jamming with a band and supporting his friends.

Photo by Upworthy/Eagle Rare.

He's also found love and says he's never been happier.

And it's largely thanks to his realization that with a little effort, he could make a huge difference in people's lives.

"If you get together with other people who have purpose and … are on the same path as you, you can actually change a lot of stuff."

Learn more about Breedlove's story here:

LGBTQ Taxi

He's doing his part to make sure the LGBTQ community can feel safe using ride-sharing services. Especially to and from transition-related care appointments.

Posted by Upworthy Presents on Monday, April 16, 2018
Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash
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This story was originally shared on Capital One.

Inside the walls of her kitchen at her childhood home in Guatemala, Evelyn Klohr, the founder of a Washington, D.C.-area bakery called Kakeshionista, was taught a lesson that remains central to her business operations today.

"Baking cakes gave me the confidence to believe in my own brand and now I put my heart into giving my customers something they'll enjoy eating," Klohr said.

While driven to launch her own baking business, pursuing a dream in the culinary arts was economically challenging for Klohr. In the United States, culinary schools can open doors to future careers, but the cost of entry can be upwards of $36,000 a year.

Through a friend, Klohr learned about La Cocina VA, a nonprofit dedicated to providing job training and entrepreneurship development services at a training facility in the Washington, D.C-area.

La Cocina VA's, which translates to "the kitchen" in Spanish, offers its Bilingual Culinary Training program to prepare low-and moderate-income individuals from diverse backgrounds to launch careers in the food industry.

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Vanna White appeared on "The Price Is Right" in 1980.

Vanna White has been a household name in the United States for decades, which is kind of hilarious when you consider how she gained her fame and fortune. Since 1982, the former model and actress has made millions walking back and forth turning letters (and later simply touching them—yay technology) on the game show "Wheel of Fortune."

That's it. Walking back and forth in a pretty evening gown, flipping letters and clapping for contestants. More on that job in a minute…

As a member of Gen X, television game shows like "Wheel of Fortune" and "The Price is Right" send me straight back to my childhood. Watching this clip from 1980 of Vanna White competing on "The Price is Right" two years before she started turning letters on "Wheel of Fortune" is like stepping into a time machine. Bob Barker's voice, the theme music, the sound effects—I swear I'm home from school sick, lying on the ugly flowered couch with my mom checking my forehead and bringing me Tang.

This video has it all: the early '80s hairstyles, a fresh-faced Vanna White and Bob Barker's casual sexism that would never in a million years fly today.

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