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College move-in week is an exciting time in parents' and students' lives — but it doesn't come cheap.

We've all heard about the rising cost of college tuition, and anyone who's purchased a college textbook knows how financially daunting higher education can be.

But there are other costs that often get lost in the discussion — things that many Americans may take for granted, but are a significant challenge for others. Dorm living requires some basics that some students struggle to afford. Considering the fact that the average family spends close to $1000 on college back-to-school items, kids who are coming from disadvantaged communities or are the first in their families to go to college may not be prepared for the cost of moving in to their dorm rooms.


The toll of student debt...

Posted by Grown and Flown on Tuesday, July 31, 2018

Some moms recognized that students who couldn't afford dorm essentials needed some help — so they took action.

Mary Dell Harrington and Lisa Heffernan are the moms behind the website Grown and Flown — an online community for parents with kids ages 15 to 25. When one of their readers suggested raising funds for college students who could use some assistance with getting settled at school, the moms created an initiative now known as Move In Moms.

Harrington, an alumna of University of Texas at Austin, enlisted the help of businesses and other parents — in partnership with her alma mater — to raise funds for over 200 students in the UT Austin Foundation Scholars Program to get dorm supplies last year.

Each student received a dorm bundle, which included a laundry hamper, sheets, a pillow, a shower caddy, a surge protector, towels, a mattress pad, and a bed bug encasement. Harrington said that it was exciting to support students by offering them items "to feather their nest a little bit."

Target donated $10,000 for Move In Moms to purchase supplies for 250 hard-working college students.

The University of Texas has been on a mission to increase graduation rates, especially for students at risk of dropping out. Anything that eases the financial burden of these students makes a difference. Move In Moms is making move-in week less stressful for 250 students, many of whom are first generation college students working multiple jobs to pay for their education.

With a big corporate partner like Target in their court, hopefully Move In Moms will achieve their goal to spread to other universities. Surely plenty of parents facing their own empty nests would be happy to help other young people get a solid start in their college career.

Pretty much.

Posted by Grown and Flown on Tuesday, July 17, 2018

Unless or until college in the U.S. becomes more affordable, such programs are a necessity for many students.

As college costs rise higher education falls out of reach for many people. Even for those who receive scholarships or financial aid, additional expenses are sometimes unaffordable. Until we make some major changes on a broad level to make college less costly, communities helping communities will have to be the way we solve individual financial hardships.

If there's anyone we can count on to make sure kids are taken care of, it's moms. Keep up the awesome work, Move In Moms.

Albert Einstein

One of the strangest things about being human is that people of lesser intelligence tend to overestimate how smart they are and people who are highly intelligent tend to underestimate how smart they are.

This is called the Dunning-Kruger effect and it’s proven every time you log onto Facebook and see someone from high school who thinks they know more about vaccines than a doctor.

The interesting thing is that even though people are poor judges of their own smarts, we’ve evolved to be pretty good at judging the intelligence of others.

“Such findings imply that, in order to be adaptive, first impressions of personality or social characteristics should be accurate,” a study published in the journal Intelligence says. “There is accumulating evidence that this is indeed the case—at least to some extent—for traits such as intelligence extraversion, conscientiousness, openness, and narcissism, and even for characteristics such as sexual orientation, political ideology, or antigay prejudice.”

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Photo by Phuong Tran on Unsplash

This article originally appeared on 08.06.19


Recently, blogger Jen Hatmaker had a funny conversation with a friend about parenting:

"My girlfriend told me the greatest story. Apparently her 11-year-old also wanted to be a grown up this week and, in fact, not only did he treat his siblings like despised underlings, but when asked what he wanted, he said: 'I want the authority to be in charge of them and tell them what to do, because they deserve it!'


Well. My girlfriend and her husband are NOT AT ALL MESSING AROUND with parenting. Calmly, evenly, they granted his request to be a grown-up for a week by pulling him out of camp (the underlings still got to go, because they are 'such children') and sending him to work ALL DAY EVERY DAY with his dad. He has to get up early and shower and make breakfast for everyone. He has to kiss the underlings before he goes to work and tell them to have a great day and that he loves them. He has to work on a typing project during his office hours. He only gets to eat what his dad eats, because eating like a grown-up is not nearly as fun as eating like a kid.


Want to be an adult? Fine."

Photo via iStock.

Hatmaker's post went viral, with thousands of parents chiming in with their own stories of tough love, both giving and receiving.

The responses were hilarious, poignant, and a sign that the next generation is being parented by extremely capable, if not a little bit diabolical, hands.

Here are five of my favorite stories from the comments about parenting-gone-absolutely-right:

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Baby Cora bears a striking resemblance to actor Woody Harrelson.

We can all get a little fascinated by doppelgängers and it's fun to find people who look alike. But what do you do when your baby girl looks uncannily like a famous middle-aged man?

Mom Dani Grier Mulvenna shared a photo of her infant daughter Cora side by side with a photo of Woody Harrelson on Twitter, with the caption "Ok but how does our daughter look like Woody Harrelson." The resemblance truly is remarkable, and the tweet quickly racked up hundreds of thousands of likes, shares and replies.

Naturally, the jokes about Harrelson being the baby's secret father came next, but then Harrelson himself got wind of it.

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