More

Some Call Native Americans ‘Indians.’ I Believe I’ll Call These Guys Simply 'Heroes.'

There are some jobs that just look ... well, nearly impossible. For these guys? Piece of cake.

Some Call Native Americans ‘Indians.’ I Believe I’ll Call These Guys Simply 'Heroes.'

There are seven Hotshot crews in operation:

Fort Apache IHC

Their home base is Whiteriver, Arizona, on the White Mountain Apache Reservation. It was the first nationally funded all-Native American Hotshot crew in the country.


Geronimo IHC

Members of the Geronimo Hotshots pride themselves on being in prime physical and mental shape. The film clip above is all about these folks. Check it out.


Golden Eagles

The only Hotshot crew based in California, it's based on the Sycuan Reservation.

Navajo IHC

This crew is based out of Fort Defiance, Arizona, on the Navajo Reservation, near the four-corners region (where Colorado, Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah come together).

Warm Springs IHC

Based on the Warm Springs Reservation in Oregon, it's the second-oldest Native American crew in existence.


Zuni IHC

This crew is based in west-central New Mexico on the Zuni Reservation. Its first assignment was to assist with the World Trade Center attack in 2001.

Chief Mountain IHC

These folks are based out of the Blackfeet Reservation in Browning, Montana, right next to Glacier National Park. On average, the crew fights 15 to 20 large fire incidents per year and travels 10,000 to 20,000 miles to do so.

True

If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.