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Some Call Native Americans ‘Indians.’ I Believe I’ll Call These Guys Simply 'Heroes.'

There are some jobs that just look ... well, nearly impossible. For these guys? Piece of cake.

Some Call Native Americans ‘Indians.’ I Believe I’ll Call These Guys Simply 'Heroes.'

There are seven Hotshot crews in operation:

Fort Apache IHC

Their home base is Whiteriver, Arizona, on the White Mountain Apache Reservation. It was the first nationally funded all-Native American Hotshot crew in the country.


Geronimo IHC

Members of the Geronimo Hotshots pride themselves on being in prime physical and mental shape. The film clip above is all about these folks. Check it out.


Golden Eagles

The only Hotshot crew based in California, it's based on the Sycuan Reservation.

Navajo IHC

This crew is based out of Fort Defiance, Arizona, on the Navajo Reservation, near the four-corners region (where Colorado, Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah come together).

Warm Springs IHC

Based on the Warm Springs Reservation in Oregon, it's the second-oldest Native American crew in existence.


Zuni IHC

This crew is based in west-central New Mexico on the Zuni Reservation. Its first assignment was to assist with the World Trade Center attack in 2001.

Chief Mountain IHC

These folks are based out of the Blackfeet Reservation in Browning, Montana, right next to Glacier National Park. On average, the crew fights 15 to 20 large fire incidents per year and travels 10,000 to 20,000 miles to do so.

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Between the new normal that is working from home and e-learning for students of all ages, having functional electronic devices is extremely important. But that doesn't mean needing to run out and buy the latest and greatest model. In fact, this cycle of constantly upgrading our devices to keep up with the newest technology is an incredibly dangerous habit.

The amount of e-waste we produce each year is growing at an increasing rate, and the improper treatment and disposal of this waste is harmful to both human health and the planet.

So what's the solution? While no one expects you to stop purchasing new phones, laptops, and other devices, what you can do is consider where you're purchasing them from and how often in order to help improve the planet for future generations.

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Sir David Attenborough has one of the most recognized and beloved voices in the world. The British broadcaster and nature historian has spent most of his 94 years on Earth educating humanity about the wonders of the natural world, inspiring multiple generations to care about the planet we all call home.

And now, Attenborough has made a new name for himself. Not only has he joined the cool kids on Instagram, he's broken the record for reaching a million followers in the shortest period. It only took four hours and 44 minutes, which is less time than it took Jennifer Aniston, who held the title before him at 5 hours and 16 minutes.

A day later, Attenborough is sitting at a whopping 3.4 million followers. And he only has two Instagram posts so far, both of them videos. But just watch his first one and you'll see why he's attracted so many fans.

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$200 billion of COVID-19 recovery funding is being used to bail out fossil fuel companies. These mayors are combatting this and instead investing in green jobs and a just recovery.

Learn more on how cities are taking action: c40.org/divest-invest


Schools often have to walk a fine line when it comes to parental complaints. Diverse backgrounds, beliefs, and preferences for what kids see and hear will always mean that schools can't please everyone all the time, so educators have to discern what's best for the whole, broad spectrum of kids in their care.

Sometimes, what's best is hard to discern. Sometimes it's absolutely not.

Such was the case this week when a parent at a St. Louis elementary school complained in a Facebook group about a book that was read to her 7-year-old. The parent wrote:

"Anyone else check out the read a loud book on Canvas for 2nd grade today? Ron's Big Mission was the book that was read out loud to my 7 year old. I caught this after she watched it bc I was working with my 3rd grader. I have called my daughters school. Parents, we have to preview what we are letting the kids see on there."

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One night in 2018, Sheila and Steve Albers took their two youngest sons out to dinner. Their 17-year-old son, John, was in a crabby mood—not an uncommon occurrence for the teen who struggled with mental health issues—so he stayed home.

A half hour later, Sheila's started getting text messages that John wasn't safe. He had posted messages with suicidal ideations on social media and his friends had called the police to check on him. The Albers immediately raced home.

When they got there, they were met with a surreal scene. Their minivan was in the neighbor's yard across the street. John had been shot in the driver's seat six times by a police officer who had arrived to check on him. The officer had fired two shots as the teen slowly backed the van out of the garage, then 11 more after the van spun around backward. But all the officers told the Albers was that John had "passed" and had been shot. They wouldn't find out until the next day who had shot and killed him.

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