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Selma Blair just rocked her first appearance since her MS diagnosis with a cape and cane.
Photo by Dia Dipasupil/Getty Images

When Selma Blair first announced her multiple sclerosis diagnosis in October 2018, she said she wanted to bring hope to others who have the disease.

On Oscar Sunday, Blair did just that when the actress walked the red carpet at the Vanity Fair Oscar party looking like a total goddess.

Blair, clad in a stunning gown accessorized with a cape and a cane, got emotional at the significance of the moment. “It took so much to be here,” said Blair, who was greeted by a round of applause. Blair then posed for photos, proving you can still ooze glamor from your pores even after a MS diagnosis.


Blair posted an emotional post on Instagram celebrating the evening and thanking her manager for his support. “There are moments that define us. This is one of those indelibly watermarked in my heart,” wrote Blair.

“So this was a streak of light. To say I am here. I am still in an exacerbation so there was some nervousness. I don’t do anything the way I was once able. I will though. I can regain much.”

Photo by Dia Dipasupil/Getty Images

Blair’s look that night is destined to become iconic. The actress completely rocked her custom-made cane. “This is love,” Blair wrote on Instagram alongside an image of her cane. “How did I get so lucky?  I wanted a special cane for #vanityfair dinner. So... @lyon_hearted went out and found patent leather and @bic_owen and he stitched it on. Hours of love put in. And then #tombachick made it especially magical. I burst into tears. These gifts to get me through. #subtle #chic #love. I can’t thank these three enough. There are angels.”

Blair’s look was a hit, serving as inspiration to others. She was also lauded for drawing attention to MS, which more than 400,000 Americans live with.

Blair has been open about her challenges following her MS diagnosis. “Going out, being sociable holds a heavy price,” Blair wrote in an Instagram post following her diagnosis.

“My brain is on fire. I am freezing. We feel alone with it even though the loving support has been a godsend and appreciated.”

Kudos to Blair for being honest about her experiences while totally killing it in the elegance department!

A viral video from a Little League game has people celebrating good sportsmanship.

Youth sports have gotten more intensely competitive, to the point where overeager parents and coaches have to regularly be reminded to take it down a notch. So when humanity takes precedence over team rivalries, it's extra heartwarming.

And considering how many "kids these days" laments we see coming from older generations, it's also heartening to see kids showing excellent character qualities when no one directly asked them to.

A viral video from a Little League baseball game is giving us a nice dose of both—good sportsmanship and basic human kindness from two players from opposing teams.

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Life isn't just about looking at screens.

What a time to be alive. We have cars that drive themselves, stunning art created by artificial intelligence and my personal favorite—air fryers! It's a reality worthy of George Jetson, who may or may not have been born this very year, according to some Twitter theorists.

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But still, even with these modern marvels, there are some experiences that need no improvement … even if they do take twice as long.

A Reddit user recently asked the online forum to share one thing they “still preferred to do the old-fashioned way, regardless of technology.”

Unsurprisingly, a main theme in people’s answers had to do with “old-fashioned” activities having a tangible quality to them. Activities that require touch, taste, smell … those things that make us feel human. Sure, efficiency and convenience are great, but feeling alive is pretty great too.

Here are 17 of the best answers that might have you going back to Team Analog:

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Pop Culture

Guy makes a tweet about what you should have 'by age 30.' People's responses were hilarious.

"By the age of 30 you should have anxiety, and an emotional support pet that also has anxiety."

Photo by NIPYATA! on Unsplash

This is 30.

When Steve Adcock, an entrepreneur and “fitness buff” posted this to his Twitter:

“By age 30, you should have a group of friends that talk business, money, and fitness, not politics and pop culture.”

… people had thoughts.



His post might have been intended as more of an encouragement to surround yourself with people who challenge your current mindset, considering the tweet continued with “one of the biggest mistakes I've ever made was making friends with like-minded folks who talked about the same [stuff] over and over. I agreed with 99% of it. Your comfort zone will kill your progress.”

But still, overall the tweet left an unsavory taste in people’s mouths—primarily because it implied that money was somehow a better conversation topic than what people are usually genuinely passionate about. Why not talk about your favorite television show with friends if it lights you up inside?


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