What's that over there? Is that two large building blocks in the middle of Milan covered in a rich, green forest?

Why yes, yes it is. In the Porta Nuova district of Milan, Italy, there is a pair of residential towers that (will) host more than 900 trees on 8,900 square meters of terraces as part of a "rehabilitation" of the historic district.

Or in other terms: lots and lots of trees in a tiny little space to make the place look prettier. An ace creative idea.


Here is the vertical forest being built...

...and here are two renderings of what the future of this block will look like.

Fun fact: The design was tested in a wind tunnel to ensure the trees would not topple from gusts of wind.

Here is a video detailing the plan behind it all.

Oh, and just a side thought about the video: How much does the man at 0:23 look like Hugh Jackman?! IS HE HUGH JACKMAN'S LONG LOST TWIN BROTHER?

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Shkoryah Carthen has spent half of her life working in the service industry. While the 32-year old restaurant worker quickly sensed that Covid-19 would bring real change to her daily life, Carthen hardly knew just how strongly it would impact her livelihood.

"The biggest challenge for me during this time, honestly is just to stay afloat," Carthen said.

Upon learning the Dallas restaurant she worked for would close indefinitely, Carthen feared its doors may never reopen.

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Over 500,000 people have died.

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Get Shift Done
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Shkoryah Carthen has spent half of her life working in the service industry. While the 32-year old restaurant worker quickly sensed that Covid-19 would bring real change to her daily life, Carthen hardly knew just how strongly it would impact her livelihood.

"The biggest challenge for me during this time, honestly is just to stay afloat," Carthen said.

Upon learning the Dallas restaurant she worked for would close indefinitely, Carthen feared its doors may never reopen.

Soon after, Carthen learned that The Wilkinson Center was desperately looking for workers to create and distribute meals for those in need in their community. The next day, Carthen was at the food pantry restocking shelves and creating relief boxes filled with essentials like canned foods, baby formula and cleaning products. In addition to feeding families throughout the area, this work ensured Carthen the opportunity to provide food for her own.

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