No one will ever look at Ted Cruz the same way after this hilarious commercial.

If there were awards for politics, Ted Cruz would surely win “Most Spineless Performance by a Senator” for the way he’s groveled before Donald Trump over the past two years.

During the 2016 Republican primaries, Trump dubbed the Texas senator, “Lyin’ Ted” and tweeted a disgusting meme mocking his wife’s looks.

Trump even spread a ridiculous National Enquirer story that claimed Cruz’s father, Rafael, was involved in the Kennedy assassination.


“His father was with Lee Harvey Oswald prior to Oswald's being — you know, shot. I mean, the whole thing is ridiculous,” Trump said in a phone interview with Fox News. “What is this, right prior to his being shot, and nobody even brings it up. They don't even talk about that. That was reported, and nobody talks about it.”

“I mean, what was he doing — what was he doing with Lee Harvey Oswald shortly before the death? Before the shooting?” Trump continued. “It’s horrible.”

Even after Trump defeated Cruz for the Republican nomination, he still stood by the conspiracy.

“All I did is point out the fact that on the cover of the National Enquirer there was a picture of him and crazy Lee Harvey Oswald having breakfast,” he said.

After the Republican convention, Cruz said he wouldn’t endorse Trump for president. “I am not in the habit of supporting people who attack my wife and who attack my father,” Cruz said.

But, five weeks before the election, Cruz endorsed him in a Facebook post. “A year ago, I pledged to endorse the Republican nominee, and I am honoring that commitment,” Cruz wrote. “And if you don’t want to see a Hillary Clinton presidency, I encourage you to vote for him.”

Cruz and Trump buried the hatchet after the election and Cruz would write a glowing 165-word essay about the man who insulted his family.

President Trump is a flash-bang grenade thrown into Washington by the forgotten men and women of America. The fact that his first year as Commander in Chief disoriented and distressed members of the media and political establishment is not a bug but a feature.

President Trump is doing what he was elected to do: disrupt the status quo. That scares the heck out of those who have controlled Washington for decades, but for millions of Americans, their confusion is great fun to watch.

Now, Cruz, a man who’s become synonymous with the term spineless, is using “Tough As Texas” as his re-election campaign slogan.

Currently, polls show Cruz is neck and neck with Democrat Beto O’Rourke, which is one of the most shocking stories of the 2018 midterms.

Texas hasn’t had a Democratic senator in 25 years.

Filmmaker and Texas native Richard Linklater (“Before Sunrise,” “Boyhood,” “Dazed And Confused”), has created a hilarious new anti-Ted Cruz ad that mocks the senator's macho “Tough As Texas” slogan.

It features Sonny Carl Davis reprising his role from Linklater’s underrated 2011 gem “Bernie,” sitting in a coffee shop talking politics.

“If somebody [called] my wife a dog and said my daddy was in on the Kennedy assassination, I wouldn’t be kissing their ass,” Davis said. Instead, he says he’d “drag their ass out by the woodshed and kick their ass, Ted.”

Don’t mess with Texas.

Photo by Daniel Schludi on Unsplash
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Meanwhile, outbreaks across South America, Africa, and Asia continued, as the highly contagious virus continued to kill three out of every 10 people who caught it, while leaving many survivors disfigured. It took a renewed commitment of resources from wealthy nations to fulfill the promise made in 1959.

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Photo by ismail mohamed - SoviLe on Unsplash

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Photo by Daniel Schludi on Unsplash
True

The global eradication of smallpox in 1980 is one of international public health's greatest successes. But in 1966, seven years after the World Health Organization announced a plan to rid the world of the disease, smallpox was still widespread. The culprits? A lack of funds, personnel and vaccine supply.

Meanwhile, outbreaks across South America, Africa, and Asia continued, as the highly contagious virus continued to kill three out of every 10 people who caught it, while leaving many survivors disfigured. It took a renewed commitment of resources from wealthy nations to fulfill the promise made in 1959.

Forty-one years later, although we face a different virus, the potential for vast destruction is just as great, and the challenges of funding, personnel and supply are still with us, along with last-mile distribution. Today, while 30% of the U.S. population is fully vaccinated, with numbers rising every day, there is an overwhelming gap between wealthy countries and the rest of the world. It's becoming evident that the impact on the countries getting left behind will eventually boomerang back to affect us all.

Photo by ismail mohamed - SoviLe on Unsplash

The international nonprofit CARE recently released a policy paper that lays out the case for U.S. investment in a worldwide vaccination campaign. Founded 75 years ago, CARE works in over 100 countries and reaches more than 90 million people around the world through multiple humanitarian aid programs. Of note is the organization's worldwide reputation for its unshakeable commitment to the dignity of people; they're known for working hand-in-hand with communities and hold themselves to a high standard of accountability.

"As we enter into our second year of living with COVID-19, it has become painfully clear that the safety of any person depends on the global community's ability to protect every person," says Michelle Nunn, CARE USA's president and CEO. "While wealthy nations have begun inoculating their populations, new devastatingly lethal variants of the virus continue to emerge in countries like India, South Africa and Brazil. If vaccinations don't effectively reach lower-income countries now, the long-term impact of COVID-19 will be catastrophic."

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