No one will ever look at Ted Cruz the same way after this hilarious commercial.

If there were awards for politics, Ted Cruz would surely win “Most Spineless Performance by a Senator” for the way he’s groveled before Donald Trump over the past two years.

During the 2016 Republican primaries, Trump dubbed the Texas senator, “Lyin’ Ted” and tweeted a disgusting meme mocking his wife’s looks.

Trump even spread a ridiculous National Enquirer story that claimed Cruz’s father, Rafael, was involved in the Kennedy assassination.


“His father was with Lee Harvey Oswald prior to Oswald's being — you know, shot. I mean, the whole thing is ridiculous,” Trump said in a phone interview with Fox News. “What is this, right prior to his being shot, and nobody even brings it up. They don't even talk about that. That was reported, and nobody talks about it.”

“I mean, what was he doing — what was he doing with Lee Harvey Oswald shortly before the death? Before the shooting?” Trump continued. “It’s horrible.”

Even after Trump defeated Cruz for the Republican nomination, he still stood by the conspiracy.

“All I did is point out the fact that on the cover of the National Enquirer there was a picture of him and crazy Lee Harvey Oswald having breakfast,” he said.

After the Republican convention, Cruz said he wouldn’t endorse Trump for president. “I am not in the habit of supporting people who attack my wife and who attack my father,” Cruz said.

But, five weeks before the election, Cruz endorsed him in a Facebook post. “A year ago, I pledged to endorse the Republican nominee, and I am honoring that commitment,” Cruz wrote. “And if you don’t want to see a Hillary Clinton presidency, I encourage you to vote for him.”

Cruz and Trump buried the hatchet after the election and Cruz would write a glowing 165-word essay about the man who insulted his family.

President Trump is a flash-bang grenade thrown into Washington by the forgotten men and women of America. The fact that his first year as Commander in Chief disoriented and distressed members of the media and political establishment is not a bug but a feature.

President Trump is doing what he was elected to do: disrupt the status quo. That scares the heck out of those who have controlled Washington for decades, but for millions of Americans, their confusion is great fun to watch.

Now, Cruz, a man who’s become synonymous with the term spineless, is using “Tough As Texas” as his re-election campaign slogan.

Currently, polls show Cruz is neck and neck with Democrat Beto O’Rourke, which is one of the most shocking stories of the 2018 midterms.

Texas hasn’t had a Democratic senator in 25 years.

Filmmaker and Texas native Richard Linklater (“Before Sunrise,” “Boyhood,” “Dazed And Confused”), has created a hilarious new anti-Ted Cruz ad that mocks the senator's macho “Tough As Texas” slogan.

It features Sonny Carl Davis reprising his role from Linklater’s underrated 2011 gem “Bernie,” sitting in a coffee shop talking politics.

“If somebody [called] my wife a dog and said my daddy was in on the Kennedy assassination, I wouldn’t be kissing their ass,” Davis said. Instead, he says he’d “drag their ass out by the woodshed and kick their ass, Ted.”

Don’t mess with Texas.

Courtesy of Verizon
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If someone were to say "video games" to you, what are the first words that come to mind? Whatever words you thought of (fun, exciting, etc.), we're willing to guess "healthy" or "mental health tool" didn't pop into your mind.

And yet… it turns out they are. Especially for Veterans.

How? Well, for one thing, video games — and virtual reality more generally — are also more accessible and less stigmatized to veterans than mental health treatment. In fact, some psychiatrists are using virtual reality systems for this reason to treat PTSD.

Secondly, video games allow people to socialize in new ways with people who share common interests and goals. And for Veterans, many of whom leave the military feeling isolated or lonely after they lose the daily camaraderie of their regiment, that socialization is critical to their mental health. It gives them a virtual group of friends to talk with, connect to, and relate to through shared goals and interests.

In addition, according to a 2018 study, since many video games simulate real-life situations they encountered during their service, it makes socialization easier since they can relate to and find common ground with other gamers while playing.

This can help ease symptoms of depression, anxiety, and even PTSD in Veterans, which affects 20% of the Veterans who have served since 9/11.

Watch here as Verizon dives into the stories of three Veteran gamers to learn how video games helped them build community, deal with trauma and have some fun.

Band of Gamers www.youtube.com

Video games have been especially beneficial to Veterans since the beginning of the pandemic when all of us — Veterans included — have been even more isolated than ever before.

And that's why Verizon launched a challenge last year, which saw $30,000 donated to four military charities.

And this year, they're going even bigger by launching a new World of Warships charity tournament in partnership with Wargaming and Wounded Warrior Project called "Verizon Warrior Series." During the tournament, gamers will be able to interact with the game's iconic ships in new and exciting ways, all while giving back.

Together with these nonprofits, the tournament will welcome teams all across the nation in order to raise money for military charities helping Veterans in need. There will be a $100,000 prize pool donated to these charities, as well as donation drives for injured Veterans at every match during the tournament to raise extra funds.

Verizon is also providing special discounts to Those Who Serve communities, including military and first responders, and they're offering a $75 in-game content military promo for World of Warships.

Tournament finals are scheduled for August 8, so be sure to tune in to the tournament and donate if you can in order to give back to Veterans in need.

Courtesy of Verizon

As Canada's women's soccer team prepares for its gold medal match against Sweden this week in Tokyo, it also prepares to make history as the first Olympic team to have an openly transgender, non-binary athlete win a medal at the games.

Quinn, the 25-year-old midfielder, announced their non-binary identity on social media last September, adopting they/them pronouns and a singular name. Quinn said they'd been living openly as a transgender person with their loved ones, but this was their first time coming out publicly.

"I want to be visible to queer folks who don't see people like them on their feed. I know it saved my life years ago," they wrote. "I want to challenge cis folks ( if you don't know what cis means, that's probably you!!!) to be better allies."

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