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Activists, celebrities, and nearly 200 world leaders have gathered for a not-so-simple goal: to save the world.

Seriously.


These demonstrators gathered in New York on Thursday, Sept. 24, 2015, in support of the UN's Sustainable Development Goals. Photo by Brad Barket/Getty Images for Action/2015.

The UN has set out a really ambitious list of 17 goals to achieve sustainable development by the year 2030.

The goals cover a wide variety of topics, all working to end extreme poverty, fight inequality and injustice, and fix climate change.


UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon was joined by others outside UN headquarters for the announcement.

UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon is joined by his wife Madam Yoo (Ban) Soon-taek, U.K. director-screenwriter Richard Curtis, UN Deputy Secretary General Jan Eliasson, and others to watch as the 17 goals are projected onto the side of the UN headquarters in New York. Photo by Kena Betancur/Getty Images for Global Goals.

The unveiling of the goals coincided with the 70th annual meeting of the UN General Assembly.

President Obama addresses the UN on Sept. 28, 2015. Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images.

Around the world, people rallied support for the goals.

In places like Sao Paulo, Brazil:

This person from Sao Paulo shows support for goal number 5: gender equality. Photo by Mauricio Santana/Getty Images for Action/2015.

And Johannesburg, South Africa:

People in Johannesburg gathered to rally support for the global goals. Photo by Gallo Images/Getty Images.

And Sydney, Australia:

Australian actress Deborah Mailman poses on Sept. 24, 2015, in Sydney. Photo by Ryan Pierse/Getty Images for Global Goals.

In New York, Mashable's Social Good Summit devoted time to how technology can work together with Global Goals.

Model Alek Wek was in attendance:

Photo by Mark Sagliocco/Getty Images for Global Goals.

Teen clockmaker Ahmed Mohamed and National Geographic Society CEO Gary Knell addressed the summit together:

Photo by Mark Sagliocco/Getty Images for Global Goals.

And former Spice Girl Victoria Beckham and Queen Rania Al Abdullah of Jordan also made an appearance together:

Photo by Mark Sagliocco/Getty Images for Global Goals.

On Sept. 25, 2015, 193 countries signed off on the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). So ... what happens next?

Three years after the idea for the SDGs were first proposed during the Rio+20 conference, UN member countries signed off on the outline, which picks up where the oft-criticized Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) left off.

One of the biggest criticisms of the MDGs was that there wasn't much in the way of consistent data measurement. The UN hopes to address that with the release of their Data Revolution Report.

Immediately, engineers began work figuring out new ways to address the problems before them:


The next step in implementing the newly-agreed-upon SDGs is an awareness campaign.

Wonder how you can help? Start by spreading the word.

On the Global Goals website, they offer some great tips on how we can all help out.

"The more people who know about the Global Goals for sustainable development, the more successful they'll be. If we all fight for them, our leaders will make them happen. ... We need your help to share the Goals. In conversation, on e-mail, in debate, on products, at home, at work, at school whatever it takes to Tell Everyone."

And on their site, they have a number of ready-for-social-media images to share from your Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, or Google+ accounts.


A star-studded "We the People" video offers another way to get involved.

The "We the People" campaign launched with the support of people like Ashton Kutcher, Charlize Theron, Chris Martin, Colin Firth, Daniel Craig, Jennifer Lawrence, Jennifer Lopez, John Legend, Kate Winslet, Malala Yousafzai, Matt Damon, Meryl Streep, One Direction, P!nk, Robert Pattinson, Robert Redford, Stephen Hawking, Stevie Wonder, and so many more.

You can add your voice to the mix over at the Global Goals site.

Watch the video below:

Scroll down to read the goals in full:

  1. We will live in a world where nobody anywhere lives in extreme poverty.
  2. We will live in a world where no one goes hungry, no one wakes in the morning asking if there will be food today.
  3. We will live in a world where no child has to die from diseases we know how to cure and where proper health care is a lifelong right for us all.
  4. We will live in a world where everyone goes to school, and education gives us the knowledge and skills for a fulfilling life.
  5. We will live in a world where all women and all girls have equal opportunities to thrive and be powerful and safe. We can't succeed if half the world is held back.
  6. We will live in a world where all people can get clean water and proper toilets at home, at school, at work.
  7. We will live in a world where there's sustainable energy for everyone — heat, life, and power for the planet without destroying the planet.
  8. We will live in a world where economies prosper and new wealth leads to decent jobs for everyone.
  9. We will live in a world where our industries, our infrastructure, and our best innovations are not just used to make money — but to make all our lives better.
  10. We will live in a world where prejudices and extremes of inequality are defeated — inside our countries and between different countries.
  11. We will live in a world where people live in cities and communities that are safe, progressive, and support everyone who lives in them.
  12. We will live in a world where we replace what we consume — a planet where we put back what we take out of the earth.
  13. We will live in a world that is decisively rolling back the threat of climate change.
  14. We will live in a world where we restore and protect the life in our oceans and seas
  15. We will live in a world where we restore and protect life on land — the forests, the animals, the earth itself.
  16. We will live in a world with peace between and inside countries, where all governments are open and they answer to us for what they do at home and abroad, and where justice rules, with everyone equal before the law.
  17. And we must live in a world where countries and we, their people, work together in partnerships of all kinds to make these global goals a reality for everyone, everywhere.
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