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Natalie Maines of the Dixie Chicks has an important question about Donald Trump.

In 2003, the group faced major backlash for mild criticism of President Bush.

During the late '90s through the mid-2000s, the Dixie Chicks were busy winning Grammys and selling records by the millions.

They were absolutely huge. With hits like "Goodbye Earl," "Wide Open Spaces," and "Long Time Gone," things were going pretty well for the Texas trio.

The Dixie Chicks at the Grammy Awards in 1999. Photo by Vince Bucci/AFP/Getty Images.


That is until March 10, 2003, when lead singer Natalie Maines criticized then-President Bush during a concert in London.

"We don't want this war, this violence, and we're ashamed that the president of the United States is from Texas," Maines said, referencing the war in Iraq that would begin just nine days later.

The backlash began almost immediately. Three days later, Maines tried explaining the group's position, but it was too late. Radio stations across the country banned the group's music, fans threw Dixie Chicks records into bonfires, and concerts were cancelled after protests.

A local country radio personality tossed darts at a poster of the Dixie Chicks in Shreveport, Louisiana. Photo by Mario Villafuerte/Getty Images.

The outrage centered on the idea that it was un-American and unpatriotic to criticize the president.

It's amazing how much things can change in 13 years, huh?

In August 2016, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump accused President Obama of "founding" the terrorist group ISIS. He's also questioned whether Obama was born in the U.S. (He was).

He's not alone, either. Musician Ted Nugent called for the "evil carcasses" of Obama and other Democrats over their push for gun safety measures. Actress Stacey Dash went on TV to state her belief that President Obama "doesn't give a sh*t about terrorism." What were once considered unpatriotic slams against a sitting president are now the mainstream, pushed by celebrities, pundits, and politicians themselves.

By comparison, Maines saying "We're ashamed the president of the United States is from Texas" is extremely mild.

So what happened, and why did the Dixie Chicks get so much backlash?

That's what Maines wants to know:

Her point about publicly voicing criticism is fair, too.

There's a big difference between criticizing a specific policy or action (as Maines was doing by criticizing the war in Iraq) and pushing conspiracy theories about where the president was born, or making vague (and sometimes not-so-vague) threats against the lives of people in power, or resorting to name-calling ("Crooked Hillary," "Pocahontas," etc.).

Photo by Frank Micelotta/Getty Images.

Maybe — just maybe — if people with political disagreements took a page from the Dixie Chicks, the world would be a more civil place.

Whether you're a Democrat or Republican, Trump voter or Clinton supporter, we need to remember that there's a fine line between polite disagreement and unbridled rage.

In November 2015, the Dixie Chicks announced their first tour in more than a decade. They're living proof that time really does heal all wounds.

Celine Dion spoke directly to her fans on social media.

Celine Dion has shared the devastating news that she has been diagnosed with a rare neurological disorder called stiff person syndrome.

In an emotional video to her fans, the 54-year-old French-Canadian singer apologized for taking so long to reach out and explained that her health struggles have been difficult to talk about.

"As you know, I have always been an open book, and I wasn't ready to say anything before. But I'm ready now."

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A tiger at the Endangered Animal Rescue Sanctuary and a mugshot of Joe Exotic from Santa Rosa County Jail.

Netflix’s “Tiger King” will go down in history as the collective distraction that helped America get through the dark, depressing days of early COVID-19 lockdowns. The show followed the true story of the feud between private zoo owner Joe Exotic, the self-described “gay, gun-carrying, redneck with a mullet,” and Carole Baskin, founder of Big Cat Rescue.

Exotic is currently serving out a 21-year prison sentence for animal rights abuses and hiring someone to kill Baskin.

The show was a raucous look inside the world of big cat owners and brought a lot of attention to the animal abuse that runs rampant in the industry. The light it shed on the industry was so bright it led Congress to take action. The Senate unanimously passed the Big Cat Public Safety Act on December 6. The House had already passed the bill in July.

The White House has signaled that President Biden will sign the bill into law.

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Tenacious D performs at the Rock in Pott festival.

The medley that closes out the second side of the Beatles’ “Abbey Road” album is one of the most impressive displays of musicianship in the band’s storied career. It also provided the perfect send-off before the band’s official breakup months later, ending with the lyrics, “And in the end, the love you take is equal to the love you make.”

In 1969, “Abbey Road” was the last record the group made together, although “Let it Be,” recorded earlier that year, was released in 1970.

At first, the medley was just a clever way for the band to use a handful of half-finished tunes, but when it came together it was a rousing, grandiose affair.

Arranged by Paul McCartney and producer George Martin, the medley weaves together five songs written by McCartney, "You Never Give Me Your Money," "She Came in Through the Bathroom Window," "Golden Slumbers," "Carry That Weight” and "The End," and three by John Lennon, “Sun King," "Mean Mr. Mustard" and "Polythene Pam."

Fifteen seconds after the medley and the album’s conclusion, there is a surprise treat, McCartney’s 22-second “Her Majesty,” which wound up on the record as an accident.

Jack Black and Kyle Gass, collectively known as Tenacious D, recently reimagined two of the songs in the medley, "You Never Give Me Your Money" and "The End," for acoustic guitars for a performance on SiriusXM's Octane Channel. Like everything with Tenacious D, it showed off the duo’s impressive musical chops as well as their fantastic sense of humor.

The truncated version of the medley was also a wonderful tribute to the incredible work the Beatles did 53 years ago.

Warning: This video contains NSFW language.

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Google's 2022 Year in Search report shows what trended this year.

There's a lot you can tell about a person by their search history (unless they're a murder-mystery writer, in which case no one should jump to conclusions). And our search habits on the whole can tell us a lot about ourselves as a collective as well.

For better or for worse, what we look up on the internet is an indicator of what we care about, and Google's Year in Search report gives us some insight into what we cared about this past year.

There are reports for different countries as well as a global report. Let's start with what my fellow Americans looked up, shall we?

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