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Michelle Obama Makes Me Not Hate Politics For One Beautiful Moment

I've never seen a convention speech elevate the discourse before. Until now. Below the video is the list of all the awesome moments, and their time stamps, if you only have time to watch the best bits.

Michelle Obama Makes Me Not Hate Politics For One Beautiful Moment


  • At :55, she talks about awesome Americans.
  • AtAt 3:00, she talks about tragic date nights.
  • At 3:40, she pulls out the old days were so rough bit. With a coffee table.
  • At 4:40, we learn the tragic and beautiful story about her dad.
  • At 5:40, she reminds us why government and family are important.
  • At 7:00, she reminds us why being a woman is harder in this country.
  • At 7:40, she defines what it means to be an American more eloquently than a Founding Father.
  • At 8:30, she explains everything wrong with the media and politics today.
  • At 9:30, she makes the most eloquent case for Obama's presidency I have heard thus far. (Though she's probably biased.)
  • At 11:00, she rattles off his accomplishments.
  • At 12:30, she explains why all women should probably vote for him.
  • At 13:00, she explains how out of touch Mitt is, without ever mentioning his name. Well played.
  • At 14:20, she explains what being an American means in yet another beautiful way.
  • At 15:20, she explains what being a good Christian is.
  • At 15:55, she reminds me what being a new dad is all about.
  • At 16:20, I start getting a little teary. At 17:30, the crowd stops yelling.
  • At 18:00, she asks us to listen to our better angels.
  • At 19:40, she yet again defines what it means to be an American, in yet another awesome way.
  • At 21:00, she pulls out some mom guilt and demands you vote.
  • From 21:30 to 23:10, she makes me get teary again. Not cool.
  • From 23:20 to the end she makes me want to go home and hug my kids and then go out and get people to vote and then vote myself.


STOP MAKING ME CARE ABOUT POLITICS! Every time I get out, they pull me back in!

Now I have to share this. GAH.
Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash
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This story was originally shared on Capital One.

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Photo by Adelin Preda on Unsplash

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