Each morning, Durga Kami puts on his school uniform and prepares for another day of 10th grade. But not before he brushes his woolly, white beard.

Because unlike most 10th-grade students, Durga Kami is a 68-year-old grandfather.

Kami, a father of six and grandfather of eight, lives by himself in a one-room house in Syangja, Nepal. Photographer Navesh Chitrakar of Reuters followed Kami as he experienced a typical school day.


Durga Kami sits outside his house in Syangja, Nepal. Photo by Navesh Chitrakar/Reuters.

Kami grew up poor, and his family couldn't afford to keep him in school as a child.

Though he was unable to complete his studies, Kami never gave up on his dream of pursuing his education and one day becoming a teacher. Following his wife's death 15 years ago, Kami decided to work through his grief by returning to school. He even received a scholarship to cover his uniform and supplies.

Now in 10th grade, his 20 classmates call him Baa, which means father in Nepali. But even though he's old enough to be their grandfather, Kami isn't sitting on the sidelines.

Other than the fantastic beard, grandchildren, and decades of life experience, Kami is a lot like his classmates.

Six days a week, he walks more than an hour to Shree Kala Bhairab Higher Secondary School.

Kami makes his way to school with the aid of a walking stick. Photo by Navesh Chitrakar/Reuters.

He's quick to participate in class and isn't ashamed to ask for help when he needs it.

Photo by Navesh Chitrakar/Reuters.

He even plays sports with his friends at lunchtime.

Kami sets the ball during a lunchtime volleyball match. Photo by Navesh Chitrakar/Reuters.

Kami said he plans to study and learn for the rest of his life.

Not only that, but he hopes his effort encourages others to return to the classroom and improve their lives through education.

"If they see an old person with white beard like me studying in school they might get motivated as well," Kami told Reuters.

At night, Kami studies by flashlight; power outages are common. Photo by Navesh Chitrakar/Reuters.

Though he's still years away from becoming a teacher, Kami's already espoused one of life's greatest lessons.

He's living proof that we can be do-ers, dreamers, and go-getters at any age. And with the right attitude, there's no limit to what any of us can do.

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Man uses TikTok to offer 'dinner with dad' to any kid that needs one, even adult ones

Summer Clayton is the father of 2.4 million kids and he couldn’t be more proud.

Come for the food, stay for the wholesomeness.

Summer Clayton is the father of 2.4 million kids and he couldn’t be more proud. His TikTok channel is dedicated to giving people intimate conversations they might long to have with their own father, but can’t. The most popular is his “Dinner With Dad” segment.

The concept is simple: Clayton, aka Dad, always sets down two plates of food. He always tells you what’s for dinner. He always blesses the food. He always checks in with how you’re doing.

I stress the stability here, because as someone who grew up with a less-than-stable relationship with their parents, it stood out immediately. I found myself breathing a sigh of relief at Clayton’s consistency. I also noticed the immediate emotional connection created just by being asked, “How was your day?” According to relationship coach and couples counselor Don Olund, these two elements—stability and connection—are fundamental cravings that children have of their parents. Perhaps we never really stop needing it from them.


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Connecticut Senator Chris Murphy asked his Senate colleagues the questions millions of Americans have after a mass shooting.

Another school shooting. Another mass murder of innocent children. They were elementary school kids this time. There were 18 children killed—so far—this time.

The fact that I can say "this time" is enraging, but that's the routine nature of mass shootings in the U.S. It happened in Texas this time. At least three adults were killed this time. The shooter was a teenager this time.

The details this time may be different than the last time and the time before that, and the time before that, and the time before that. But there's one thing all mass shootings have in common. No, it's not mental illness. It's not racism or misogyny or religious extremism. It's not bad parenting or violent video games or lack of religion.

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Meet Eva, the hero dog who risked her life saving her owner from a mountain lion

Wilson had been walking down a path with Eva when a mountain lion suddenly appeared.

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A sweet face and fierce loyalty: Belgian Malinois defends owner.

The Belgian Malinois is a special breed of dog. It's highly intelligent, extremely athletic and needs a ton of interaction. While these attributes make the Belgian Malinois the perfect dog for police and military work, they can be a bit of a handful as a typical pet.

As Belgian Malinois owner Erin Wilson jokingly told NPR, they’re basically "a German shepherd on steroids or crack or cocaine.”

It was her Malinois Eva’s natural drive, however, that ended up saving Wilson’s life.

According to a news release from the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, Wilson had been walking down a path with Eva slightly ahead of her when a mountain lion suddenly appeared and swiped Wilson across the left shoulder. She quickly yelled Eva’s name and the dog’s instincts kicked in immediately. Eva rushed in to defend her owner.

It wasn’t long, though, before the mountain lion won the upper hand, much to Wilson’s horror.

She told TODAY, “They fought for a couple seconds, and then I heard her start crying. That’s when the cat latched on to her skull.”

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