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Learn More From These Charts Than You Would In An Entire Day's News Cycle

An average CEO makes HOW much more than an average worker?!

Learn More From These Charts Than You Would In An Entire Day's News Cycle

Did you know that corporate profits just hit another all-time high? Yeah, I find it hard to believe, too. But it's true:

Not only that, but CEO profits as a percentage of the economy just hit an all-time high. They're higher now than they've been for the last half-century. Pardon my language, but what the hell?

If the trickle-down effect was a real thing that really helped in a real way, really, that would mean that the workers employed by these CEOs are doing better, too. Right? Wrong.

Yes, you read that correctly. CEO pay is now 350 times that of an average worker. And it has skyrocketed 300% since 1990, while the average worker's pay has only risen 4%. All numbers adjusted for inflation.

And if you adjust for inflation and take a look at the average worker's hourly pay, you'll notice it hasn't changed at all in the last 50 years.

What does that all mean? Basically, while CEOs and shareholders are living large, the average worker's pay as a percentage of the economy has dropped to an all-time low.

These are just some of the charts published by Henry Blodget last week. I recommend taking a look at all of them — they are a veritable smorgasbord of information.
Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash
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This story was originally shared on Capital One.

Inside the walls of her kitchen at her childhood home in Guatemala, Evelyn Klohr, the founder of a Washington, D.C.-area bakery called Kakeshionista, was taught a lesson that remains central to her business operations today.

"Baking cakes gave me the confidence to believe in my own brand and now I put my heart into giving my customers something they'll enjoy eating," Klohr said.

While driven to launch her own baking business, pursuing a dream in the culinary arts was economically challenging for Klohr. In the United States, culinary schools can open doors to future careers, but the cost of entry can be upwards of $36,000 a year.

Through a friend, Klohr learned about La Cocina VA, a nonprofit dedicated to providing job training and entrepreneurship development services at a training facility in the Washington, D.C-area.

La Cocina VA's, which translates to "the kitchen" in Spanish, offers its Bilingual Culinary Training program to prepare low-and moderate-income individuals from diverse backgrounds to launch careers in the food industry.

That program gave Klohr the ability to fully immerse herself in the baking industry within a professional kitchen facility and receive training in an array of subjects including culinary skills, food safety, career development and English language classes.

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This article originally appeared on 04.13.18


Teens have a knack for coming up with clever ways to rage against the system.

When I was in high school, the most notorious urban legend whispered about in hallways and at parties went like this: A teacher told his class that they were allowed to put "anything" on a notecard to assist them during a science test. Supposedly, one of his students arrived on test day with a grown adult at his side — a college chemistry major, who proceeded to stand on the notecard and give him answers. The teacher was apparently so impressed by the student's cunning that he gave him a high score, then canceled class for the rest of the week because he was in such a good mood.

Of course, I didn't know anyone who'd ever actually try such a thing. Why ruin a good story with reality — that pulling this kind of trick would probably earn you detention?

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