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For years, actor Tom Hardy has supported awesome women in action movies. Thanks, Mad Max.

Tumblr user queenofthenorths took a moment from the "Mad Max: Fury Road" press conference and sent it back in time in The. Best. Way. Ever.

Once upon a time, big-time action movie star Tom Hardy predicted his own action movie future.

He's the star of the new "masculine" action film "Mad Max: Fury Road." It's wildly passing the Bechdel test, which challenges films to show women having conversations about something OTHER than the leading man. (And *gasp* somehow it still managed to have a massively successful $45 million opening weekend.)

It's getting some buzz.


Tom's been hoping to stand on equal footing with his female co-stars all along.

In a 2014 interview for the movie "The Drop," he had a thought about what it would be like to make a complete and unquestioning switcheroo to men's and women's parts in his films. He was kinda into it.

GIFs via Tumblr user queenofthenorths.

Fast-forward to the present. At the "Mad Max: Fury Road" press conference, a reporter asked Tom Hardy a familiar question...

"As you were reading the script did you ever think, 'Why are all these women in here? I thought this was supposed to be a man's movie.'?"

Tom Hardy's response was basically great:

\\

"No."

"Not for one minute."

Then Charlize Theron, his co-star and lady-sitting-in-front-of-him-on-the-movie-poster-but-he's-clearly-totally-OK-with-it, says, "Good for you."

GIFs via Tumblr user queenofthenorths.

And he replies, "I mean, it's kinda obvious."

Think about a world where we all get to score roles — on TV and in life — on equal footing with the opposite sex. And we, all of us, no matter our gender definition, work together and support each other.

That sounds kinda obviously great.

Thanks, Tom.

via UNSW

This article originally appeared on 07.10.21


Dr. Daniel Mansfield and his team at the University of New South Wales in Australia have just made an incredible discovery. While studying a 3,700-year-old tablet from the ancient civilization of Babylon, they found evidence that the Babylonians were doing something astounding: trigonometry!

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This article originally appeared on 09.08.16


92-year-old Norma had a strange and heartbreaking routine.

Every night around 5:30 p.m., she stood up and told the staff at her Ohio nursing home that she needed to leave. When they asked why, she said she needed to go home to take care of her mother. Her mom, of course, had long since passed away.

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