Florida shooting survivors now have Hollywood heavyweights in their corner: the Clooneys.

George and Amal Clooney are literally walking the walk when it comes to preventing senseless gun violence.

The humanitarian power couple confirmed they'll be marching in Washington, D.C., next month in support of the mass shooting survivors of Florida's Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School.

The incredible students, the Clooneys noted in a statement, had a lot to do with their decision.


Photo by Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images.

In the wake of the horrific Feb. 14 shooting, which left 17 people dead, student survivors are urging political leaders to prioritize common sense gun laws.

Speaking out in press interviews, tweeting directly at the president, and giving gut-wrenching speeches with the spotlight of the world shining on their community, many Marjory Stoneman Douglas students are seizing the moment to make real change.

"Politicians who sit in their gilded House and Senate seats funded by the NRA telling us nothing could have been done to prevent this, we call BS," said Emma Gonzalez, a senior at Marjory Stoneman Douglas, in a Feb. 17 speech that's since gone viral. "They say tougher guns laws do not decrease gun violence. We call BS. They say a good guy with a gun stops a bad guy with a gun. We call BS."

Emma Gonzalez during her speech on Feb. 17 in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Photo by Rhona Wise/AFP/Getty Images.

In a statement provided to Us Weekly, George and Amal explained how teens like Gonzalez inspired them to get more involved.  

The Clooneys will be attending the March for Our Lives demonstration, aimed at ending gun violence, on March 24, 2018. They're also donating $500,000 in their own children's names to help make the event a success.

They noted:

“[We] are so inspired by the courage and eloquence of these young men and women from Stoneman Douglas High School. Our family will be there on March 24 to stand side by side with this incredible generation of young people from all over the country, and in the name of our children Ella and Alexander, we’re donating 500,000 dollars to help pay for this groundbreaking event. Our children’s lives depend on it.”

Photo by Frazer Harrison/Getty Images.

The March for Our Lives, being organized largely by young people, aims to send a bold message to Washington: Enough is enough.

The demonstration will focus on raising awareness about gun violence and urging Congress to pass a "comprehensive and effective" bill that addresses mass shootings in America — one without influence from a special interest group.

"Not one more. We cannot allow one more child to be shot at school," the demonstration's website reads. "We cannot allow one more teacher to make a choice to jump in front of a firing assault rifle to save the lives of students. We cannot allow one more family to wait for a call or text that never comes. Our schools are unsafe. Our children and teachers are dying. We must make it our top priority to save these lives."

To learn more about how you can support and get involved with the March for Our Lives demonstration, visit the event's website.

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