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Florida shooting survivors now have Hollywood heavyweights in their corner: the Clooneys.

George and Amal Clooney are literally walking the walk when it comes to preventing senseless gun violence.

The humanitarian power couple confirmed they'll be marching in Washington, D.C., next month in support of the mass shooting survivors of Florida's Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School.

The incredible students, the Clooneys noted in a statement, had a lot to do with their decision.


Photo by Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images.

In the wake of the horrific Feb. 14 shooting, which left 17 people dead, student survivors are urging political leaders to prioritize common sense gun laws.

Speaking out in press interviews, tweeting directly at the president, and giving gut-wrenching speeches with the spotlight of the world shining on their community, many Marjory Stoneman Douglas students are seizing the moment to make real change.

"Politicians who sit in their gilded House and Senate seats funded by the NRA telling us nothing could have been done to prevent this, we call BS," said Emma Gonzalez, a senior at Marjory Stoneman Douglas, in a Feb. 17 speech that's since gone viral. "They say tougher guns laws do not decrease gun violence. We call BS. They say a good guy with a gun stops a bad guy with a gun. We call BS."

Emma Gonzalez during her speech on Feb. 17 in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Photo by Rhona Wise/AFP/Getty Images.

In a statement provided to Us Weekly, George and Amal explained how teens like Gonzalez inspired them to get more involved.  

The Clooneys will be attending the March for Our Lives demonstration, aimed at ending gun violence, on March 24, 2018. They're also donating $500,000 in their own children's names to help make the event a success.

They noted:

“[We] are so inspired by the courage and eloquence of these young men and women from Stoneman Douglas High School. Our family will be there on March 24 to stand side by side with this incredible generation of young people from all over the country, and in the name of our children Ella and Alexander, we’re donating 500,000 dollars to help pay for this groundbreaking event. Our children’s lives depend on it.”

Photo by Frazer Harrison/Getty Images.

The March for Our Lives, being organized largely by young people, aims to send a bold message to Washington: Enough is enough.

The demonstration will focus on raising awareness about gun violence and urging Congress to pass a "comprehensive and effective" bill that addresses mass shootings in America — one without influence from a special interest group.

"Not one more. We cannot allow one more child to be shot at school," the demonstration's website reads. "We cannot allow one more teacher to make a choice to jump in front of a firing assault rifle to save the lives of students. We cannot allow one more family to wait for a call or text that never comes. Our schools are unsafe. Our children and teachers are dying. We must make it our top priority to save these lives."

To learn more about how you can support and get involved with the March for Our Lives demonstration, visit the event's website.

Pop Culture

Two brothers Irish stepdancing to Beyoncé's country hit 'Texas Hold 'Em' is pure delight

The Gardiner Brothers and Queen Bey proving that music can unite us all.

Gardiner Brothers/TikTok (with permission)

The Gardiner Brothers stepping in time to Beyoncé's "Texas Hold 'Em."

In early February 2024, Beyoncé rocked the music world by releasing a surprise new album of country tunes. The album, Renaissance: Act II, includes a song called "Texas Hold 'Em," which shot up the country charts—with a few bumps along the way—and landed Queen Bey at the No.1 spot.

As the first Black female artist to have a song hit No. 1 on Billboard's country music charts, Beyoncé once again proved her popularity, versatility and ability to break barriers without missing a beat. In one fell swoop, she got people who had zero interest in country music to give it a second look, forced country music fans to broaden their own ideas about what country music looks like and prompted conversations about bending and blending musical genres and styles.

And she inspired the Gardiner Brothers to add yet another element to the mix—Irish stepdance.

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But it turns out that there's a much easier way to thread a needle and it doesn't involve licking it. In fact there's more than one way to thread a needle that will save you a headache from trying to see where the thread is going. There's one particular technique that has people thinking there may be witchcraft involved, but it's just science.

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Kevin Bozeat had that fact in mind when he fell ill while living in Taiwan and needed to go to the hospital. He didn't have insurance and he had no idea how much it was going to cost him. He shared the experience in a now-viral Facebook post he called "The Horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand experience."

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Moscow-based comic artist Bird Born explains why adopting a dog changed his life.


Rescuing a pet is an amazing and heroic undertaking.

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Moscow-based comic artist Bird Born experienced firsthand the power of welcoming a pet into your family when he adopted a dog.

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5 things I didn't want to hear when I was grieving and 1 thing that helped

Here are my top five things not to say to a grieving parent — and the thing I love to hear instead.


In 2013, I found out I was pregnant with triplets.

Image via iStock.

My husband and I were in shock but thrilled at the news after dealing with infertility for years. And it didn't take long for the comments to begin. When people found out, the usual remarks followed: "Triplets?! What are you going to do? Three kids at once?! Glad it's not me!"

After mastering my response (and an evil look reserved for the rudest comments), I figured that was the worst of it. But little did I know I would be facing far worse comments after two of my triplets passed away.

On June 23, 2013, I gave birth to my triplets, more than four months premature.

My daughter, Abigail, passed away that same day; my son, Parker, died just shy of 2 months old. Before then, I didn't know much about child loss; it was uncharted territory. Like most people, I wouldn't know how to respond or what to say if a friend's child passed away.

Image via iStock.

But two years later, I have found that some things are better left unsaid. These comments come from a good place, and I know people mean well, but they sure do sting.

Here are my top five things not to say to a grieving parent — and the thing I love to hear instead.

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A husband took these photos of his wife and captured love and loss beautifully.

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When I saw these incredible photos Angelo Merendino took of his wife, Jennifer, as she battled breast cancer, I felt that I shouldn't be seeing this snapshot of their intimate, private lives.

The photos humanize the face of cancer and capture the difficulty, fear, and pain that they experienced during the difficult time.

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