More

Ever hear about the lady who spilled coffee on herself at McDonald's, then sued for millions?

What happened to her was truly unbelievable. And history is, unfortunately, repeating itself.

You probably haven't heard the name Stella Liebeck. But if you were alive in the early nineties, you probably know all about her.

Liebeck was the "little old lady" at the center of the infamous "McDonald's coffee lawsuit." And for several years, her story was in every newspaper, on every late-night TV show, and being discussed in pretty much every American living room.


The story you probably heard goes something like this:

A woman spilled coffee on herself at McDonald's -- something people everywhere do all the time and totally not a big deal -- saw the opportunity to get rich, and sued McDonald's for millions. It illustrates everything that's wrong with the culture of frivolous lawsuits in America.

There's only one problem.

The story you probably heard is wrong.

Or, at the very least, woefully incomplete.

As this New York Times documentary makes clear, the spill was very, very far from "not a big deal." Liebeck suffered nightmarish injuries, including massive third-degree burns. They were so bad that she went into shock, and was immediately rushed to the emergency room, where she incurred $10,000 in medical bills.

Initially, Liebeck only asked McDonald's to reimburse her for her medical bills. But when they offered her less than a tenth of what she owed, she felt she had no choice but to sue.

Why bring this up now?

Well, on May 6, 2015, a police officer in North Carolina went to court to argue that Starbucks should compensate him for a free cup of coffee he spilled on himself, claiming that it gave him third degree burns and activated his Crohn's disease.

And already, with snarky headlines about how the "coffee was free," and how he took pictures before going to the emergency room, implying that he has no right to complain.

Ultimately, the court will decide whether his complaint has merit.

But before we rush to judge him, and make him a laughingstock, or hold him up as an example of everything that's wrong with our legal system...

We need to make sure we have all the facts.

True

It takes a special type of person to become a nurse. The job requires a combination of energy, empathy, clear mind, oftentimes a strong stomach, and a cheerful attitude. And while people typically think of nursing in a clinical setting, some nurses are driven to work with the people that feel forgotten by society.

Keep Reading Show less
via Pexels

The Emperor of the Seas.

Imagine retiring early and spending the rest of your life on a cruise ship visiting exotic locations, meeting interesting people and eating delectable food. It sounds fantastic, but surely it’s a billionaire’s fantasy, right?

Not according to Angelyn Burk, 53, and her husband Richard. They’re living their best life hopping from ship to ship for around $44 a night each. The Burks have called cruise ships their home since May 2021 and have no plans to go back to their lives as landlubbers. Angelyn took her first cruise in 1992 and it changed her goals in life forever.

“Our original plan was to stay in different countries for a month at a time and eventually retire to cruise ships as we got older,” Angelyn told 7 News. But a few years back, Angelyn crunched the numbers and realized they could start much sooner than expected.

Keep Reading Show less

Courtesy of Elaine Ahn

True

The energy in a hospital can sometimes feel overwhelming, whether you’re experiencing it as a patient, visitor or employee. However, there are a few one-of-a-kind individuals like Elaine Ahn, an operating room registered nurse in Diamond Bar, California, who thrive under this type of constant pressure.

Keep Reading Show less

We're dancing along too.

Art can be a powerful unifier. With just the right lyric, image or word, great art can soften those hard lines that divide us, helping us to remember the immense value of human connection and compassion.

This is certainly the case with “Pasoori,” a Pakistani pop song that has not only become an international hit, it’s managed to bring the long divided peoples of India and Pakistan together in the name of love. Or at least in the name of good music.
Keep Reading Show less

Dr. Alicia Jeffrey-Thomas teaches you how to pee.

A pelvic floor doctor from Boston, Massachusetts, has caused a stir by explaining that something we all thought was good for our health can cause real problems. In a video that has more than 5.8 million views on TikTok, Dr. Alicia Jeffrey-Thomas says we shouldn’t go pee “just in case.”

How could this be? The moment we all learned to control our bladders we were also taught to pee before going on a car trip, sitting down to watch a movie or playing sports.

The doctor posted the video as a response to TikTok user Sidneyraz, who made a video urging people to go to the bathroom whenever they get the chance. Sidneyraz is known for posting videos about things he didn’t learn until his 30s. "If you think to yourself, 'I don't have to go,' go." SidneyRaz says in the video. It sounds like common sense but evidently, he was totally wrong, just like the rest of humanity.

Keep Reading Show less