Disney heiress visits theme park  undercover and leaves 'livid' over working conditions.

Abigail Disney is the granddaughter of the late Roy Disney, the co-founder of the Walt Disney Co. Abigail herself does not have a job within the company, but she has made some public complaints about the way things are being run and how it is effecting the employees of the company.

Disney recently spoke on the Yahoo News show "Through Her Eyes," and shared a story of how a Magic Kingdom employee reached out to her about the poor working conditions at the theme park. So, Disney went to see for herself, and she did not like what she found.


Disney reported, "Every single one of these people I talked to were saying, 'I don't know how I can maintain this face of joy and warmth when I have to go home and forage for food in other people's garbage.'"

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Disney was especially upset because she felt her grandfather would not approve of these conditions. She said, "I was so livid when I came out of there because … my grandfather taught me to revere these people that take your tickets, that pour your soda."

The man currently in charge of Disneyland is CEO Bob Iger. Iger receives nearly $66 million a year for his salary, and Disney feels he is not sharing the wealth properly.

Disney told Yahoo News she attempted to discuss this issue with Iger via email. "I wrote Bob Iger a very long email, and one of the things I said to him was, 'You know, you're a great CEO by any measure, perhaps even the greatest CEO in the country right now. You know, your legacy is that you're a great manager. And if I were you, I would want something better than that. I would want to be known as the guy who led to a better place, because that is what you have the power to do," said Disney.

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Apparently, she never received a response from Iger and was instead directed to HR. Oof. This isn't the first time the company has been criticized. It has also been accused of implementing sexist pay practices. However, when addressed about these sort of issues, Iger pivots to the subject of Disney's education program which helps fund its employees tuition.

I guess the Magical Kingdom might not be the fairytale world it appears to be afterall...

This article originally appeared on SomeeCards. You can read it here.

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