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Depression In Teens Looks Almost Nothing Like Depression In Adults

If there are any kids in your life, you'll want to know what the signs are and what to do next.

Depression In Teens Looks Almost Nothing Like Depression In Adults

First, let's review the symptoms.

According to the National Institute of Mental Health, a depressed teen will experience the same symptoms of depression as adults (profound feelings of unhappiness, loss of interest in pleasurable activities, relentless fatigue, etc.), but those symptoms manifest themselves in ways that can be difficult to distinguish from normal teenage behavior.



Depression in teens feels the same but it looks totally different than what you'd expect in adults.

So it's vitally important that you have good communication with your teen about mental health.

Talk to them about what's normal (feeling sad occasionally) and what isn't (feeling sad constantly). Ask them if they're having any problems with bullying, social rejection, or pressure to perform well in academics or extracurricular activities. Most importantly, let them know that it can get better.

Don't know what to say? Here's a starting place.

Watch the video for more.

Albert Einstein

One of the strangest things about being human is that people of lesser intelligence tend to overestimate how smart they are and people who are highly intelligent tend to underestimate how smart they are.

This is called the Dunning-Kruger effect and it’s proven every time you log onto Facebook and see someone from high school who thinks they know more about vaccines than a doctor.

The interesting thing is that even though people are poor judges of their own smarts, we’ve evolved to be pretty good at judging the intelligence of others.

“Such findings imply that, in order to be adaptive, first impressions of personality or social characteristics should be accurate,” a study published in the journal Intelligence says. “There is accumulating evidence that this is indeed the case—at least to some extent—for traits such as intelligence extraversion, conscientiousness, openness, and narcissism, and even for characteristics such as sexual orientation, political ideology, or antigay prejudice.”

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@taliasc on TikTok

One dad who decided to go clubbing with his daughter is making our day while having the night out of his life.

Talia Schulhof (aka @taliasc) had to know she had all the makings of a viral-worthy TikTok when she posted:

“My dad wanted to go to a club so here’s how it went.”

If she didn’t know before, the now 10 million views are a sure indicator. People are loving this adorably wholesome video.

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