Dante and David apply for the same job but only one gets an interview. Here's the rest of their day.

If you've ever wanted a side-by-side illustration of how racism seeps into everyday situations like job hunting, driving, and even going to the doctor, this video from Brave New Films breaks it down flawlessly.

<span class="redactor-invisible-space"></span><span class="redactor-invisible-space"></span>

Racism isn't just about racial slurs. It's much much bigger.

Many of us are aware of only one type of racism: blatant racism, like using slurs. In reality, racism's a lot bigger — and deeper — than that.

If you don't have time to watch the video above, here are just three surprising ways that racism takes shape in everyday life:


1. Jobs

What's in a name? Well, for people of color with more "ethnic names" (and let's be real, what does that even mean?), it can mean the difference between getting an interview or not. And let's remember that there are plenty of white people with unique names, like Bristol Palin and Pilot Inspektor. The problem isn't having a name that's unique or hard to pronounce. The issue is that certain types of names are labeled as "ghetto" or "unprofessional" only when they're associated with people of color. Changing one's name isn't the solution — changing how we view people of color and their worth is.

2. Home ownership

Although we've come a long way since the Jim Crow laws of the 1800s that prohibited black people from owning homes, black people and other people of color still encounter housing discrimination. The Fair Housing Project's documentary "A Matter of Place" not only details the history of housing discrimination in the U.S., but it also includes a few undercover experiments that reveal just how pervasive the practice is.

3. Health care

One of the most shocking ways that racism infiltrates the lives of people of color happens within the health care industry. Not only do black folk and people of color struggle to maintain healthy lifestyles as a result of issues like childhood obesity, food deserts, and lack of health care coverage, studies have shown that doctors are less likely to offer advanced treatment to black patients.

But jobs, home ownership, and health care are just the tip of the systematic racism iceberg.

  • Higher car prices: Black consumers pay about $700 more for a car than white consumers.
  • Higher incarceration rates: Black folks are six times as likely to be sent to prison.
  • More police stops: Black drivers are twice as likely to be pulled over.
  • And more...

All these seemingly small things are different ways people of color face discrimination that add up to really big problems and challenges.

Even with what I know and have experienced as a black woman, thinking about this stuff often overwhelms me and makes me super depressed. Systemic racism just feels so big. And in comparison, I feel incredibly helpless and small.

But here's the cool thing: Our voices are actually part of the solution. Educating ourselves and each other is an important first step. I mean, you can't fix a problem if you don't know the problem exists, right? So while we still have a long way to go, thanks for taking the time to educate yourself so we can work toward equality for everyone.

Wanna dig deeper and find more ways to help? Check out this great article from Everyday Feminism: "10 Simple Ways White People Can Step Up to Fight Everyday Racism."

More
True
The Atlantic Philanthropies
via The Guardian / YouTube

Beluga whales are affectionately known as sea canaries for their song-like vocalizations, and their name is the Russian word for "white."

They are sociable animals that live, hunt, and migrate together in pods, ranging from a few individuals to hundreds of whales. However, they are naturally reticent to interact with humans, although some solitary belugas are known to approach boats.

Once such beluga that's believed to live in Norwegian waters is so comfortable among humans that it played fetch with a rugby ball.

Keep Reading Show less
popular

Many of us are too young to remember the hijacking of Pan Am Flight 73 of 1986, much less any details about it. But thanks to a viral Facebook post from Misfit History, some attention is being shed on an incredible heroine who saved many American lives in the standoff.

The post reads:

Keep Reading Show less
popular

The truth doesn't hurt for an elementary school teacher in California who's gone viral for teaching her class an empowering remix of one of Lizzo's hit songs.

Ms. Mallari — who teaches at Los Medanos Elementary School in Pittsburg, east of San Francisco — took the singer's song, "Truth Hurts," and reworked the lyrics to teach her students how to be great.

Lizzo's song made history this year for being the longest running number one single from a female rap artist. The catchy original lyrics are about boy problems, but Mallari's remix teaches her students about fairness, helping each other out, and embracing their own greatness.

Keep Reading Show less
popular
via Newsy People / Twitter

The internet was ablaze after notoriously private actor Keanu Reeves, 55, walked the red carpet at the LACMA Art + Film Gala on Saturday with his new girlfriend, artist Alexandra Grant, 46.

It was refreshing to see a man in Hollywood dating a woman who's age-appropriate. Older actors are notorious for being with women half their age.

Keep Reading Show less
popular