Check out this video of Gal Gadot meeting a teary-eyed Wonder Woman fan.

Wonder Woman came to the rescue of a young fan at Comic-​Con — and honestly, it just got a little dusty in here. I'm cryin'.

A young girl, dressed as Wonder Woman, approached Gal Gadot in tears during a meet and greet with the "Justice League" cast. According to the girl's mom, children's author Christine Keller, the girl was so overcome with joy that she couldn't stop crying.

"There’s no reason to cry," Gadot can be heard telling the young fan in a video of the encounter, captured by Variety. "Here we are together."


"Your ability to cry is what makes you such a warrior," Ezra Miller, one of Gadot's "Justice League" co-stars chimed in. "Come join the Justice League whenever you get ready."

"These characters matter and can have a huge influence on young people," wrote Keller on her Facebook page. She's not alone in thinking that, either.

"What a great role model and genuine, nice person. My daughter will always remember this moment for the rest of her life. Thank you, Gal Gadot!"

Back in June, "Wonder Woman" director Patty Jenkins shared some awesome feedback she received from a kindergarten teacher.

Around the time of the film's release, actress Viola Davis posted a photo of her daughter dressed as the iconic character and has talked about how Wonder Woman helped inspire her to be brave and stand up to bullies when she was growing up.

Boys have plenty of iconic heroes they can see themselves in on the big screen: Batman, Superman, Spider-Man, 12 different iterations of The Doctor on "Doctor Who," and on and on. That's why when an awesomely badass character like Wonder Woman gets a chance (and absolutely nails it, by the way), it's worth taking note.

There's even more good news for Wonder Woman fans: In addition to the upcoming "Justice League" movie, Warner Bros. confirmed that there's going to be a "Wonder Woman" sequel.

Check out this Wonder Woman-focused "Justice League" sneak peek that debuted at Comic-Con. *makes loud, excited noises*

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When I found out I was pregnant in October 2018, I had planned to keep the news a secret from family for a little while — but my phone seemed to have other ideas.

Within just a few hours of finding out the news, I was being bombarded with ads for baby gear, baby clothes and diapers on Facebook, Instagram and pretty much any other site I visited — be it my phone or on my computer.

Good thing my family wasn't looking over my shoulder while I was on my phone or my secret would have been ruined.

I'm certainly not alone in feeling like online ads can read your mind.

When I started asking around, it seemed like everyone had their own similar story: Brian Kelleher told me that when he and his wife met, they started getting ads for wedding rings and bridal shops within just a few weeks. Tech blogger Snezhina Piskov told me that she started getting ads for pocket projectors after discussing them in Messenger with her colleagues. Meanwhile Lauren Foley, a writer, told me she started getting ads for Happy Socks after seeing one of their shops when she got off the bus one day.

When online advertising seems to know us this well, it begs the question: are our phones listening to us?

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Kids say the darnedest things and, if you're a parent, you know that can make for some embarrassing situations. Every parent has had a moment when their child has said something unintentionally inappropriate to a stranger and they prayed they wouldn't take it the wrong way.

Cassie, the mother of 4-year-old Camryn, had one of the those moments when her child yelled, "Black lives matter" to a Black woman at a Colorado Home Depot.

But the awkward interaction quickly turned sweet when the Black woman, Sherri Gonzales, appreciated the comment and thanked the young girl.

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Mozilla
True
Firefox

When I found out I was pregnant in October 2018, I had planned to keep the news a secret from family for a little while — but my phone seemed to have other ideas.

Within just a few hours of finding out the news, I was being bombarded with ads for baby gear, baby clothes and diapers on Facebook, Instagram and pretty much any other site I visited — be it my phone or on my computer.

Good thing my family wasn't looking over my shoulder while I was on my phone or my secret would have been ruined.

I'm certainly not alone in feeling like online ads can read your mind.

When I started asking around, it seemed like everyone had their own similar story: Brian Kelleher told me that when he and his wife met, they started getting ads for wedding rings and bridal shops within just a few weeks. Tech blogger Snezhina Piskov told me that she started getting ads for pocket projectors after discussing them in Messenger with her colleagues. Meanwhile Lauren Foley, a writer, told me she started getting ads for Happy Socks after seeing one of their shops when she got off the bus one day.

When online advertising seems to know us this well, it begs the question: are our phones listening to us?

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Photo by Mahir Uysal on Unsplash

Two years ago, I got off the phone after an interview and cried my eyes out. I'd just spent an hour talking to Tim Ballard, the founder of Operation Underground Railroad, an organization that helps fight child sex trafficking, and I just couldn't take it.

Ballard told me about how the training to go undercover as a child predator nearly broke him. He told me an eerie story of a trafficker who could totally compartmentalize, showing Ballard photos of kids he had for sale, then switching gears to proudly show him a photo of his own daughter on her bicycle, just as any parent would. He told me about how lucrative child trafficking is—how a child can bring in three or four times as much as a female prostitute—and how Americans are the industry's biggest consumers.

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Most of us don't think of a bird as a cuddly pet, but Swoop the snuggly magpie didn't care what humans think. After he was rescued by New Zealander Matt Owens, the baby bird became a beloved part of the family—the family being Owens and his cat, Mowgli.

"It was just sitting there bleeding, sort of unable to walk properly and it looked like it had been abandoned by its mum so I just picked it up and decided to take it home," Owens told Newshub. The timing of finding Swoop couldn't have been better. Owens' dad had just been diagnosed with terminal cancer, and the bond he formed taking care of Swoop gave Owens an extra dose of love and comfort.

Mowgli wasn't sure about the new family member at first, but soon took to Swoop and the two became fur-feather friends. The Dodo recently shared a video on Facebook highlighting Owens, Swoop, and Mowgli's story, and it's unbelievably adorable.

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