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Queen's 1977 anthem "We Will Rock You" is one of the band's biggest hits and a staple at sporting events across the world.

Sometimes you'll hear it on classic rock radio stations played back-to-back with Queen's other jock jam, "We are the Champions" for a perfect one-two punch of '70s rock pomposity.

It's no mistake that "We Will Rock You" is so popular with sports fans. It was written by guitarist Brian May after a crowd sang the English football anthem, "You'll Never Walk Alone" at a Queen concert at Bingley Hall in 1977.


"We were just completely knocked out and taken aback – it was quite an emotional experience really, and I think these chant things are in some way connected with that," May told Radio 1.

RELATED: Queen is thinking about throwing a massive concert to fight climate change

In an attempt to write songs that have the same feel as football chants, May wrote "We Will Rock You" and vocalist Freddie Mercury wrote "We are the Champions. Mercury's song was an ode to "My Way" made popular by Frank Sinatra.

The song's signature stomp-stomp-clap beat was written by May to encourage crowd participation.

The double-A side single of "We Will Rock You" / "We are the Champions was released in October 1977 in the UK where it rose to #2 on the charts.

A YouTuber named Badger has created a unique version of the song using dialog clips from over 100 movies and TV shows to sing the lyrics to the Queen classic. It features clips from "Vampire's Kiss," "Bob's Burgers," "Full Metal Jacket," and "Jaws," just to name a few.

Take a look and see how many you can name.

The 2018 hit Freddie Mercury biopic "Bohemian Rhapsody" has a scene that recounts how May introduced "We Will Rock You" to the band.

Here's Queen performing "We Will Rock You" and "We are the Champions" live in 1982.

In the late '70s, Queen often opened with a fast version of "We Will Rock You" then played the classic boom-boom-clap arrangement in the encore.

Photo by CDC on Unsplash

When schools closed early in the spring, the entire country was thrown for a loop. Parents had to figure out what to do with their kids. Teachers had to figure out how to teach students at home. Kids had to figure out how to navigate a totally new routine that was being created and altered in real time.

For many families, it was a big honking mess—one that many really don't want to repeat in the fall.

But at the same time, the U.S. hasn't gotten a handle on the coronavirus pandemic. As states have begun reopening—several of them too early, according to public health officials—COVID-19 cases have risen to the point where we now have more cases per day than we did during the height of the outbreak in the spring. And yet President Trump is making a huge push to get schools to reopen fully in the fall, even threatening to possibly remove funding if they don't.

It's worth pointing out that Denmark and Norway had 10 and 11 new cases yesterday. Sweden and Germany had around 300 each. The U.S. had 55,000. (And no, that's not because we're testing thousands of times more people than those countries are.)

The president of the country's largest teacher's union had something to say about Trump's push to reopen schools. Lily Eskelsen Garcia says that schools do need to reopen, but they need to be able to reopen safely—with measures that will help keep both students and teachers from spreading the virus and making the pandemic worse. (Trump has also criticized the CDCs "very tough & expensive guidelines" for reopening schools.)

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