A brilliant YouTuber took over 100 movie and TV clips and turned them into Queen's 'We Will Rock You'
via a a / Flickr

Queen's 1977 anthem "We Will Rock You" is one of the band's biggest hits and a staple at sporting events across the world.

Sometimes you'll hear it on classic rock radio stations played back-to-back with Queen's other jock jam, "We are the Champions" for a perfect one-two punch of '70s rock pomposity.

It's no mistake that "We Will Rock You" is so popular with sports fans. It was written by guitarist Brian May after a crowd sang the English football anthem, "You'll Never Walk Alone" at a Queen concert at Bingley Hall in 1977.


"We were just completely knocked out and taken aback – it was quite an emotional experience really, and I think these chant things are in some way connected with that," May told Radio 1.

RELATED: Queen is thinking about throwing a massive concert to fight climate change

In an attempt to write songs that have the same feel as football chants, May wrote "We Will Rock You" and vocalist Freddie Mercury wrote "We are the Champions. Mercury's song was an ode to "My Way" made popular by Frank Sinatra.

The song's signature stomp-stomp-clap beat was written by May to encourage crowd participation.

The double-A side single of "We Will Rock You" / "We are the Champions was released in October 1977 in the UK where it rose to #2 on the charts.

A YouTuber named Badger has created a unique version of the song using dialog clips from over 100 movies and TV shows to sing the lyrics to the Queen classic. It features clips from "Vampire's Kiss," "Bob's Burgers," "Full Metal Jacket," and "Jaws," just to name a few.

Take a look and see how many you can name.

The 2018 hit Freddie Mercury biopic "Bohemian Rhapsody" has a scene that recounts how May introduced "We Will Rock You" to the band.

Here's Queen performing "We Will Rock You" and "We are the Champions" live in 1982.

In the late '70s, Queen often opened with a fast version of "We Will Rock You" then played the classic boom-boom-clap arrangement in the encore.

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The best way to honor Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is to share her legacy with the next generation. The feminist icon may have passed away last week at the age of 87, but she lives on in the hearts and minds of multiple generations of Americans, especially women.

In the 1970s, the young Ginsburg "convinced the entire nation, through [her arguments at the] Supreme Court, to... adopt the view of gender equality where equal means the same -- not special accommodations for either gender," Abbe Gluck, a Yale Law School professor and former clerk of Justice Ginsburg, told ABC News.

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The legality of abortion is one of the most polarized debates in America—but it doesn’t have to be.

People have big feelings about abortion, which is understandable. On one hand, you have people who feel that abortion is a fundamental women’s rights issue, that our bodily autonomy is not something you can legislate, and that those who oppose abortion rights are trying to control women through oppressive legislation. On the other, you have folks who believe that a fetus is a human individual first and foremost, that no one has the right to terminate a human life, and that those who support abortion rights are heartless murderers.

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I got married and started working in my early 20s, and for more than two decades I always had employer-provided health insurance. When the Affordable Care Act (ACA, aka "Obamacare")was passed, I didn't give it a whole lot of thought. I was glad it helped others, but I just assumed my husband or I would always be employed and wouldn't need it.

Then, last summer, we found ourselves in an unexpected scenario. I was working as a freelance writer with regular contract work and my husband left his job to manage our short-term rentals and do part-time contracting work. We both had incomes, but for the first time, no employer-provided insurance. His previous employer offered COBRA coverage, of course, but it was crazy expensive. It made far more sense to go straight to the ACA Marketplace, since that's what we'd have done once COBRA ran out anyway.

The process of getting our ACA healthcare plan set up was a nightmare, but I'm so very thankful for it.

Let me start by saying I live in a state that is friendly to the ACA and that adopted and implemented the Medicaid expansion. I am also a college-educated and a native English speaker with plenty of adult paperwork experience. But the process of getting set up on my state's marketplace was the most confusing, frustrating experience I've ever had signing up for anything, ever.

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