A brilliant YouTuber took over 100 movie and TV clips and turned them into Queen's 'We Will Rock You'

Can you name all the clips?

via a a / Flickr

Queen's 1977 anthem "We Will Rock You" is one of the band's biggest hits and a staple at sporting events across the world.

Sometimes you'll hear it on classic rock radio stations played back-to-back with Queen's other jock jam, "We are the Champions" for a perfect one-two punch of '70s rock pomposity.

It's no mistake that "We Will Rock You" is so popular with sports fans. It was written by guitarist Brian May after a crowd sang the English football anthem, "You'll Never Walk Alone" at a Queen concert at Bingley Hall in 1977.


"We were just completely knocked out and taken aback – it was quite an emotional experience really, and I think these chant things are in some way connected with that," May told Radio 1.

RELATED: Queen is thinking about throwing a massive concert to fight climate change

In an attempt to write songs that have the same feel as football chants, May wrote "We Will Rock You" and vocalist Freddie Mercury wrote "We are the Champions. Mercury's song was an ode to "My Way" made popular by Frank Sinatra.

The song's signature stomp-stomp-clap beat was written by May to encourage crowd participation.

The double-A side single of "We Will Rock You" / "We are the Champions was released in October 1977 in the UK where it rose to #2 on the charts.

A YouTuber named Badger has created a unique version of the song using dialog clips from over 100 movies and TV shows to sing the lyrics to the Queen classic. It features clips from "Vampire's Kiss," "Bob's Burgers," "Full Metal Jacket," and "Jaws," just to name a few.

Take a look and see how many you can name.

The 2018 hit Freddie Mercury biopic "Bohemian Rhapsody" has a scene that recounts how May introduced "We Will Rock You" to the band.

Here's Queen performing "We Will Rock You" and "We are the Champions" live in 1982.

In the late '70s, Queen often opened with a fast version of "We Will Rock You" then played the classic boom-boom-clap arrangement in the encore.

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