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A Georgia artist came up with a hilarious idea for improving a notorious Confederate monument.

Short of completely destroying the thing, this is basically the best option possible.

Stone Mountain is one of America's most popular Confederate memorials.

Photo by KyleAndMelissa22/Wikimedia Commons.


The north side of the 825-foot rock in Georgia features a giant carving of Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee, and Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson.

Photo by David Iliff/Wikimedia Commons.

The park surrounding it is Georgia's most-visited attraction.

But for many in the Atlanta area and beyond, the idea of glorifying the people who fought hardest to preserve slavery in America doesn't sit right.

In the wake of the Charleston shooting, calls to remove the monument grew louder.

Others insisted that the carving was part of local history and should be left standing.

Which gave local artist Mack Williams a brilliant idea.

Don't destroy Confederate memorial on Stone Mountain.

Just add a carving of legendary hip-hop duo Outkast in a Cadillac.

"I'm sorry, General Jackson." Image by Mack Williams, used with permission.

"There's nothing that unites the people of Atlanta like Outkast," Williams told Upworthy. "Their music transcends race, class, creed and unifies the entire Metro area."

"With all the debate about Confederate symbols in the news today, I felt like I'd come up with a solid compromise that stopped short of sandblasting it off," he said.

The site of Big Boi and Andre 3000 straight chillin' next to some of the most infamous men in American history might be alarming to some.

Photo by Theo Wargo/Getty Images.

But Williams sees the revision as an attempt to right a historic wrong.

"The current sculpture represents a pretty awful time in the history of Georgia and our nation," Williams said. "A lot of Confederate revisionists may argue otherwise, but they're just misinformed. Adding Outkast to the sculpture would bring balance to the force."

Using comedy to rob terrible things of their power has a long and storied history.

A petition to add the sculpture has already gathered over 7,000 signatures. The petition was even endorsed by Big Boi himself on Twitter.


"Getting a thumbs up emoji from Big Boi is certainly a high point of this whole thing," Williams said. "I'm glad to know he digs the idea. No word from Three Stacks [Andre 3000] yet!"

No matter how big the petition gets, Williams knows his idea is unlikely to come to fruition.

But since it also looks like the monument won't be removed anytime soon, he's already accomplished at least one important goal: The more people laughing at Stone Mountain, the better.

"I am for reeeeeeaaaal." Image by Mack Williams, used with permission.

Photo from Dole
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As you sit down to eat your breakfast in the morning or grab an afternoon snack, take a minute to consider your food, how it was made, and how it got to your plate.

The fruit on your plate were grown and picked on farms, then processed, packaged and sent to the grocery store where you bought them.

Sounds simple, right?

The truth is, that process is anything but simple and at every step in the journey to your plate, harm can be caused to the people who grow it, the communities that need it, and the planet we all call home.

For example, thousands of kids live in food deserts and areas where access to affordable and nutritious food is limited. Around the world, one in three children suffer from some form of malnutrition, and yet, up to 40% of food in the United States is never eaten.

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This week, viral photos from the first day of school in various Georgia counties showed students crowded together with few masks in sight. Schools in the same area had to shut down entire classrooms due to positive tests after the first day back, quarantining students and teachers for two weeks.

In these counties, students are "encouraged" to wear a mask at school, but they are not required. Mask-wearing is referred to as a "personal choice."

This week, a private Christian college in a town near where I live announced that is planning to resume in-person classes this fall. The school has decided that students will not be required to wear masks, despite the fact that the town itself has a mask mandate for all public spaces. "No riots. No masks. In person. This fall," the college wrote in a Facebook post advertising the school last month.

The supposed justification for not requiring students to wear masks is that it's a "personal choice," and that students have the freedom to choose whether to wear one or not.

That's a neat story. Except it is totally hypocritical coming from schools and school districts that have no problem placing limits on personal choice and freedom by mandating stringent dress codes for students.

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Photo from Dole
True

As you sit down to eat your breakfast in the morning or grab an afternoon snack, take a minute to consider your food, how it was made, and how it got to your plate.

The fruit on your plate were grown and picked on farms, then processed, packaged and sent to the grocery store where you bought them.

Sounds simple, right?

The truth is, that process is anything but simple and at every step in the journey to your plate, harm can be caused to the people who grow it, the communities that need it, and the planet we all call home.

For example, thousands of kids live in food deserts and areas where access to affordable and nutritious food is limited. Around the world, one in three children suffer from some form of malnutrition, and yet, up to 40% of food in the United States is never eaten.

Keep Reading Show less

I saw this poster today and I was going to just let it go, but then I kept feeling tugged to say something.

Melanie Cholish/Facebook

While this poster is great to bring attention to the issue of child trafficking, it is a "shocking" picture of a young girl tied up. It has that dark gritty feeling. I picture her in a basement tied to a dripping pipe.

While that sounds awful, it's important to know that trafficking children in the US is not all of that. I can't say it never is—I don't know. What I do know is most young trafficked children aren't sitting in a basement tied up. They have families, and someone—usually in their family—is trafficking them.

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via The Hubble Telescope

Over the past few years, there has been a growing movement to fight back against some of the everyday racism that exists in America.

The Washington Redskins of the NFL have temporarily changed their name to the Washington Football Team until a more suitable, and less racist, name is determined.

The Dixie Chicks, a country band from Texas has decided to change their name to The Chicks to avoid any connotation with slavery, as has Lady Antebellum who now just go by Lady A.

(Although they stole the name form a Black woman who has been using it for over 20 years.)

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