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A Georgia artist came up with a hilarious idea for improving a notorious Confederate monument.

Short of completely destroying the thing, this is basically the best option possible.

A Georgia artist came up with a hilarious idea for improving a notorious Confederate monument.

Stone Mountain is one of America's most popular Confederate memorials.

Photo by KyleAndMelissa22/Wikimedia Commons.


The north side of the 825-foot rock in Georgia features a giant carving of Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee, and Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson.

Photo by David Iliff/Wikimedia Commons.

The park surrounding it is Georgia's most-visited attraction.

But for many in the Atlanta area and beyond, the idea of glorifying the people who fought hardest to preserve slavery in America doesn't sit right.

In the wake of the Charleston shooting, calls to remove the monument grew louder.

Others insisted that the carving was part of local history and should be left standing.

Which gave local artist Mack Williams a brilliant idea.

Don't destroy Confederate memorial on Stone Mountain.

Just add a carving of legendary hip-hop duo Outkast in a Cadillac.

"I'm sorry, General Jackson." Image by Mack Williams, used with permission.

"There's nothing that unites the people of Atlanta like Outkast," Williams told Upworthy. "Their music transcends race, class, creed and unifies the entire Metro area."

"With all the debate about Confederate symbols in the news today, I felt like I'd come up with a solid compromise that stopped short of sandblasting it off," he said.

The site of Big Boi and Andre 3000 straight chillin' next to some of the most infamous men in American history might be alarming to some.

Photo by Theo Wargo/Getty Images.

But Williams sees the revision as an attempt to right a historic wrong.

"The current sculpture represents a pretty awful time in the history of Georgia and our nation," Williams said. "A lot of Confederate revisionists may argue otherwise, but they're just misinformed. Adding Outkast to the sculpture would bring balance to the force."

Using comedy to rob terrible things of their power has a long and storied history.

A petition to add the sculpture has already gathered over 7,000 signatures. The petition was even endorsed by Big Boi himself on Twitter.


"Getting a thumbs up emoji from Big Boi is certainly a high point of this whole thing," Williams said. "I'm glad to know he digs the idea. No word from Three Stacks [Andre 3000] yet!"

No matter how big the petition gets, Williams knows his idea is unlikely to come to fruition.

But since it also looks like the monument won't be removed anytime soon, he's already accomplished at least one important goal: The more people laughing at Stone Mountain, the better.

"I am for reeeeeeaaaal." Image by Mack Williams, used with permission.

via USO

Army Capt. Justin Meredith used the Bob Hope Legacy Reading Program to read to his son and family while deployed in the Middle East.

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One of the biggest challenges deployed service members face is the feeling of being separated from their families, especially when they have children. It's also very stressful for children to be away from parents who are deployed for long periods of time.

For the past four years, the USO has brought deployed service members and their families closer through a wonderful program that allows them to read together. The Bob Hope Legacy Reading Program gives deployed service members the ability to choose a book, read it on camera, then send both the recording and book to their child.

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Cayce LaCorte explains why virginity doesn't exist.

The concept of virginity is a very loaded issue in American culture. If a woman loses hers when she's too young she can be slut-shamed. If a man remains a virgin for too long, he can be bullied for not being manly enough.

There is also a whole slew of religious mind games associated with virginity that can give people some serious psychological problems associated with sex.

Losing one's virginity has also been blown up way beyond proportion. It's often believed that it's a magical experience—it's usually not. Or that after having sex for the first time people can really start to enjoy living life—not the case.

What if we just dropped all of the stigmas surrounding virginity and instead, replaced them with healthy attitudes toward sex and relationships?

Writer Cayce LaCorte is going viral on TikTok for the simple way she's taught her five daughters to think about virginity. They don't have to. LaCorte shared her parenting ideas on TikTok in response to mom-influencer Nevada Shareef's question: "Name something about the way you raised your kids that people think is weird but you think is healthy."

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The Rock and Oscar Rodriguez on Instagram.

As the old saying goes, “do good and it will come back to you in unexpected ways.”

Sometimes those “unexpected ways” come in four-wheel drive.

Oscar Rodriguez is a Navy veteran, church leader and personal trainer in Culver City, California. More important than that, he is a good person with a giving heart. In addition to taking care of his 75-year-old mom, he also makes meals for women victims of domestic violence.

Rodriguez thought he won the ultimate prize: going to a special VIP screening of Dwayne Johnson's new film "Red Notice," and getting pulled up on stage by The Rock himself. But it only got better from there.

Thanking him for his service, praising him for giving back to his community and bonding with him as a fellow “mamma’s boy,” Johnson stands with Rodriguez on the stage exchanging hugs … until Johnson says “I wanna show you something real quick.”

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@bluffbakes on Tiktok

Chloe Sexton—baker, business owner, mother—knows all too well about "daddy privilege," that is, when men receive exorbitant amounts of praise for doing normal parental duties. You know, the ones that moms do without so much as a thank you.

In a lighthearted (while nonetheless biting) TikTok video, Chloe shares a "fun little story about 'daddy privilege'" that has now gone viral—no doubt due in part because working moms can relate to this on a deep, personal and infuriating level.

Chloe's TED Talks-worthy rant begins with:

"My husband has a job. I have a business, my husband has a job. Could not make that any clearer, right? Well, my bakery requires that we buy certain wholesale ingredients at this place called Restaurant Depot every week. You've seen me do videos of it before where I'm, like, wearing him or was massively pregnant buying 400 pounds of flour and 100 pounds of butter, and that's a weekly thing. The list goes on and on, like — it's a lot."
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