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A Georgia artist came up with a hilarious idea for improving a notorious Confederate monument.

Short of completely destroying the thing, this is basically the best option possible.

A Georgia artist came up with a hilarious idea for improving a notorious Confederate monument.

Stone Mountain is one of America's most popular Confederate memorials.

Photo by KyleAndMelissa22/Wikimedia Commons.


The north side of the 825-foot rock in Georgia features a giant carving of Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee, and Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson.

Photo by David Iliff/Wikimedia Commons.

The park surrounding it is Georgia's most-visited attraction.

But for many in the Atlanta area and beyond, the idea of glorifying the people who fought hardest to preserve slavery in America doesn't sit right.

In the wake of the Charleston shooting, calls to remove the monument grew louder.

Others insisted that the carving was part of local history and should be left standing.

Which gave local artist Mack Williams a brilliant idea.

Don't destroy Confederate memorial on Stone Mountain.

Just add a carving of legendary hip-hop duo Outkast in a Cadillac.

"I'm sorry, General Jackson." Image by Mack Williams, used with permission.

"There's nothing that unites the people of Atlanta like Outkast," Williams told Upworthy. "Their music transcends race, class, creed and unifies the entire Metro area."

"With all the debate about Confederate symbols in the news today, I felt like I'd come up with a solid compromise that stopped short of sandblasting it off," he said.

The site of Big Boi and Andre 3000 straight chillin' next to some of the most infamous men in American history might be alarming to some.

Photo by Theo Wargo/Getty Images.

But Williams sees the revision as an attempt to right a historic wrong.

"The current sculpture represents a pretty awful time in the history of Georgia and our nation," Williams said. "A lot of Confederate revisionists may argue otherwise, but they're just misinformed. Adding Outkast to the sculpture would bring balance to the force."

Using comedy to rob terrible things of their power has a long and storied history.

A petition to add the sculpture has already gathered over 7,000 signatures. The petition was even endorsed by Big Boi himself on Twitter.


"Getting a thumbs up emoji from Big Boi is certainly a high point of this whole thing," Williams said. "I'm glad to know he digs the idea. No word from Three Stacks [Andre 3000] yet!"

No matter how big the petition gets, Williams knows his idea is unlikely to come to fruition.

But since it also looks like the monument won't be removed anytime soon, he's already accomplished at least one important goal: The more people laughing at Stone Mountain, the better.

"I am for reeeeeeaaaal." Image by Mack Williams, used with permission.

via KrustyKhajiit / YouTube

Thomas F. Wilson played one of the most recognizable villains in film history, Biff Tannen, in the "Back to the Future" series. So, understandably, he gets recognized wherever he goes for the iconic role.

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Courtesy of FIELDTRIP
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Pete Buttigieg is having a moment. The former mayor of South Bend, Indiana keeps trending on social media for his incredibly eloquent explanations of issues—so much so that L.A. Times columnist Mary McNamara has dubbed him "Slayer Pete," who excels in "the five-minute, remote-feed evisceration." From his old-but-newly-viral explanation of late-term abortion to his calm calling out of Mike Pence's hypocrisy, Buttigieg is making a name for himself as Biden's "secret weapon" and "rhetorical assassin."

And now he's done it again, this time taking on the 'originalist' view of the Constitution.

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Buttigieg explained the problem with originalism in a segment on MSNBC, speaking from what McNamara jokingly called his "irritatingly immaculate kitchen." And in his usual fashion, he totally nails it. After explaining that he sees "a pathway to judicial activism cloaked in judicial humility" in Coney Barrett's descriptions of herself, he followed up with:

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via WatchMojo / YouTube

There are two conflicting viewpoints when it comes to addressing culture from that past that contains offensive elements that would never be acceptable today.

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