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On Thursday, Nov. 12, 2015, justice was finally served: Actor Daniel Radcliffe was awarded his own star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

Photo by Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images.


"It's really an incredible honor," Radcliffe told Variety of his star. "We [Brits] have a national embarrassment about people saying nice things about us, so I was taken aback at first, but then I had a real sense of gratitude."

This is huge. Because, as every DanRad super fan knows all-too-well, there is no one — no one — more deserving of a Walk of Fame star than flawless specimen Daniel Radcliffe.

Photo by Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images.

Don't believe me? Here are seven "scientifically proven" reasons why Daniel Radcliffe isn't just an incredible actor, but one of Hollywood's most indisputably perfect humans.

Photo by Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images.

1. Is he annoyed by his "Harry Potter" fame? Hardly! Radcliffe's eternally grateful for everything the franchise has given him.

Photo by Jason Merritt/Getty Images.

When quizzed about his favorite book back in 2013, Radcliffe answered, "Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone."

"It would be churlish of me not to say that it was the book that gave me everything I have."

2. He thinks it's disgusting that the term "friend zone" actually exists. And he's absolutely right.

Photo by Jens Noergaard Larsen/AFP/Getty Images.

Sometimes, when women just want to be friends with men (as opposed to dating or sleeping with them), men call this being trapped in the "friend zone." Which, of course, is essentially saying, "Women are only of value to me when they're sexually available to me." Yeah, it's awful.

When the topic got brought up during an interview with BuzzFeed, Radcliffe seized the opportunity to call it exactly what it is.

"Friend zoning is, like, a terrible thing. The idea of the 'friend zone' is a terrible male [thing] ... Have you ever heard a girl say they're in the 'friend zone'? ... I definitely think the idea of 'friend zone' is just men going 'This woman won't have sex with me.'"

3. He can rap. And like, is really, really good at it.

Remember when he shocked the "The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon" audience by flawlessly rapping every word of Blackalicious' "Alphabet Aerobics"?

Yeah. He did that.

Wow.

4. Radcliffe loves (and is amazingly good at) pulling pranks on the paparazzi.

Photo by Vivien Killilea/Getty Images for SiriusXM.

"I would wear the same outfit every single time with different T-shirts underneath, but I would wear the same jacket and zip it up so they couldn't see what I was wearing underneath, and the same hat," he explained on "The Tonight Show with Jay Leno" in 2007, according to CBS. "So they could take photos for six months but it would look like the same day. They became un-publishable, which was hilarious because there's nothing better than seeing the paparazzi get really frustrated."

That. Is. Genius.

5. He's bravely opened up about his struggles with — and triumphs over — a dependence on alcohol as a teen.

Photo by Ben Gabbe/Getty Images.

"I have a very addictive personality. It was a problem," Radcliffe told Heat magazine in 2012 of being drunk on set of the "Harry Potter" films, CBS reported. "People with problems like that are very adept at hiding it. It was bad."

"You either have to change something or give into that shame."

6. Radcliffe is unapologetically feminist to his core, and thinks it's very backwards that anyone wouldn't be.

Photo by Carl Court/AFP/Getty Images.

Does Radcliffe stand for gender equality? Of course.

"There seems to be a very recent thing that you come 'out' as a feminist," he explained to British GQ last year. "It's a very weird thing. I mean, yes of course, but I'm a feminist in as much as I'm an egalitarian about everything and I believe in meritocracy. I think anyone who isn't at this point is just swimming against the tide just like people who are vaguely homophobic or racist or sexist or whatever it is. I just think 'God, you're still keeping that up? Give it up, you've lost.'"

7. Radcliffe is 100% content being short. And knows exactly how to respond when people comment on his stature.

Photo by Ian Gavan/Getty Images.

Radcliffe is on the shorter side, relatively speaking. And while that used to be something he thought about, those days are long gone.

"I was worried on a personal level because I wanted to be slightly taller than I am, ideally," he told MTV News in 2010. "But I've now accepted it. Basically, I came to the conclusion a while ago that you can either be really bitter about it or you can make loads of funny jokes."

Jokes? Like what?

"When I meet people now and they all say, 'God you're so much shorter than I expected!' I always say, 'No! I'm actually slightly further away than you think.'"

8. He stands up for his co-stars — especially when sexist Hollywood double standards are involved.

Photo by Scott Gries/Getty Images.

During a promotional interview in 2014, Radcliffe brought up the fact that it's unfair for anyone to feel uncomfortable seeing him as sex symbol simply because they witnessed him grow up on screen, while his "Harry Potter" co-star Emma Watson had a much different experience.

"A lot of people were saying, you know, 'You're [a] really unconventional romantic lead.' And so eventually, I got bored of hearing that and like, kind of picked someone up on it. So I was like, 'What about me is unconventional exactly? Like, tell me.' And she said, 'Well, I think it's probably the fact that, you know, we associated you with playing Harry and a young boy for so long, you know.' My immediate response was, 'Well, the male population has had no problems sexualizing Emma Watson immediately.'"

9. He's been a committed ally in the fight for LGBTQ equality for years.

Photo by Andrew H. Walker/Getty Images.

Is Radcliffe offended by gay rumors? Of course not — he thinks they're "awesome," actually. And why would he be offended? He's been a vocal advocate for LGBT rights throughout his entire life in the spotlight, including his charitable work with The Trevor Project, a leading suicide prevention group helping save LGBTQ youth.

Sure, being a superb actor is great. And Radcliffe deserves that star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame for that reason alone.

But being a rapping, short n' proud, feminist prankster? Now those are characteristics of Hollywood's most perfect human.

Photo by Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images.

Joy

Nurse turns inappropriate things men say in the delivery room into ‘inspirational’ art

"Can you move to the birthing ball so I can sleep in the bed?"

Holly the delivery nurse.

After working six years as a labor and delivery nurse Holly, 30, has heard a lot of inappropriate remarks made by men while their partners are in labor. “Sometimes the moms think it’s funny—and if they think it’s funny, then I’ll laugh with them,” Holly told TODAY Parents. “But if they get upset, I’ll try to be the buffer. I’ll change the subject.”

Some of the comments are so wrong that she did something creative with them by turning them into “inspirational” quotes and setting them to “A Thousand Miles” by Vanessa Carlton on TikTok.

“Some partners are hard to live up to!” she jokingly captioned the video.

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All images provided by Adewole Adamson

It begins with more inclusive conversations at a patient level

True

Adewole Adamson, MD, of the University of Texas, Austin, aims to create more equity in health care by gathering data from more diverse populations by using artificial intelligence (AI), a type of machine learning. Dr. Adamson’s work is funded by the American Cancer Society (ACS), an organization committed to advancing health equity through research priorities, programs and services for groups who have been marginalized.

Melanoma became a particular focus for Dr. Adamson after meeting Avery Smith, who lost his wife—a Black woman—to the deadly disease.

melanoma,  melanoma for dark skin Avery Smith (left) and Adamson (sidenote)

This personal encounter, coupled with multiple conversations with Black dermatology patients, drove Dr. Adamson to a concerning discovery: as advanced as AI is at detecting possible skin cancers, it is heavily biased.

To understand this bias, it helps to first know how AI works in the early detection of skin cancer, which Dr. Adamson explains in his paper for the New England Journal of Medicine (paywall). The process uses computers that rely on sets of accumulated data to learn what healthy or unhealthy skin looks like and then create an algorithm to predict diagnoses based on those data sets.

This process, known as supervised learning, could lead to huge benefits in preventive care.

After all, early detection is key to better outcomes. The problem is that the data sets don’t include enough information about darker skin tones. As Adamson put it, “everything is viewed through a ‘white lens.’”

“If you don’t teach the algorithm with a diverse set of images, then that algorithm won’t work out in the public that is diverse,” writes Adamson in a study he co-wrote with Smith (according to a story in The Atlantic). “So there’s risk, then, for people with skin of color to fall through the cracks.”

Tragically, Smith’s wife was diagnosed with melanoma too late and paid the ultimate price for it. And she was not an anomaly—though the disease is more common for White patients, Black cancer patients are far more likely to be diagnosed at later stages, causing a notable disparity in survival rates between non-Hispanics whites (90%) and non-Hispanic blacks (66%).

As a computer scientist, Smith suspected this racial bias and reached out to Adamson, hoping a Black dermatologist would have more diverse data sets. Though Adamson didn’t have what Smith was initially looking for, this realization ignited a personal mission to investigate and reduce disparities.

Now, Adamson uses the knowledge gained through his years of research to help advance the fight for health equity. To him, that means not only gaining a wider array of data sets, but also having more conversations with patients to understand how socioeconomic status impacts the level and efficiency of care.

“At the end of the day, what matters most is how we help patients at the patient level,” Adamson told Upworthy. “And how can you do that without knowing exactly what barriers they face?”

american cancer society, skin cacner treatment"What matters most is how we help patients at the patient level."https://www.kellydavidsonstudio.com/

The American Cancer Society believes everyone deserves a fair and just opportunity to prevent, find, treat, and survive cancer—regardless of how much money they make, the color of their skin, their sexual orientation, gender identity, their disability status, or where they live. Inclusive tools and resources on the Health Equity section of their website can be found here. For more information about skin cancer, visit cancer.org/skincancer.

The mesmerizing lost art of darning knit fabric.

For most of human history, people had to make their own clothing by hand, and sewing skills were subsequently passed down from generation to generation. Because clothing was so time-consuming and labor-intensive to make, people also had to know how to repair clothing items that got torn or damaged in some way.

The invention of sewing and knitting machines changed the way we acquire clothing, and the skills people used to possess have largely gone by the wayside. If we get a hole in a sock nowadays, we toss it and replace it. Most of us have no idea how to darn a sock or fix a hole in any knit fabric. It's far easier for us to replace than to repair.

But there are still some among us who do have the skills to repair clothing in a way that makes it look like the rip, tear or hole never happened, and to watch them do it is mesmerizing.

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Pop Culture

Artist uses AI to create ultra realistic portraits of celebrities who left us too soon

What would certain icons look like if nothing had happened to them?

Mercury would be 76 today.

Some icons have truly left this world too early. It’s a tragedy when anyone doesn’t make it to see old age, but when it happens to a well-known public figure, it’s like a bit of their art and legacy dies with them. What might Freddie Mercury have created if he were granted the gift of long life? Bruce Lee? Princess Diana?

Their futures might be mere musings of our imagination, but thanks to a lot of creativity (and a little tech) we can now get a glimpse into what these celebrities might have looked like when they were older.

Alper Yesiltas, an Istanbul-based lawyer and photographer, created a photography series titled “As If Nothing Happened,” which features eerily realistic portraits of long gone celebrities in their golden years. To make the images as real looking as possible, Yesiltas incorporated various photo editing programs such as Adobe Lightroom and VSCO, as well as the AI photo-enhancing software Remini.

“The hardest part of the creative process for me is making the image feel ‘real’ to me,” Yesiltas wrote about his passion project. “The moment I like the most is when I think the image in front of me looks as if it was taken by a photographer.”

Yesiltas’ meticulousness paid off, because the results are uncanny.

Along with each photo, Yesiltas writes a bittersweet message “wishing” how things might have gone differently … as if nothing happened.
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