7 amusing comics show what dating looks like versus being in a serious relationship.

Do you remember the first time you felt comfortable enough to fart in front of your significant other?

Sure, it's embarrassing at first. But isn't it a beautiful thing to get to that place where you're comfortable with each other? Where you can pass a little gas without running for the hills in utter embarrassment?

That's where these lovely comics by Sarah Andersen come in. Her own relationship inspired this delightful series of what a couple looks like from the beginning stages of a relationship to when it gets serious.


These seven comics perfectly capture what it feels like to go from a new, budding relationship to a long-term one:

1. Prepping.

Meeting up with your cutie? Well, in a long-term relationship those nervous butterflies vanish in favor of comfort. What's the point of getting all dressed up when you know they love you regardless? What this basically translates to is sweatpants all the time — forever and always.

Illustrations by Sarah Andersen for College Humor, featured with permission.

2. Cuddling.

As a general rule, cuddling is great, but lying next to another human being for hours at a time can have its own discomforts. I, for one, am guilty of this particular move:

3. Dining.

Dinner dates can be awkward in the beginning. Eating in front of someone when you're nervous is particularly nerve-racking. But don't worry. The more time you spend with someone, the more comfortable you'll get about stuffing your face.

4. Communication.

When you're constantly with someone, the two of you start to develop a language of your own. Over time, your communications with your partner might deteriorate into silly garble.

5. Honesty.

At the beginning of a relationship, it's hard to discuss things that are more personal, but around the one-year mark your inhibitions have a tendency to just straight-up vanish.

6. Physical intimacy.

Movies and magazines will have you feeling like you need to have some kind of highly seductive alter ego to keep a relationship going, but you'll eventually learn that this is totally unnecessary. Your seduction tactics might devolve from complex, Cosmo-magazine-inspired moves to a simpler, blunter method.

7. How you feel.

Infatuation might die out, but if you're in the right relationship, love shouldn't change. If you're with someone who's seen the nastiest, pukiest, slimiest version of yourself and they still love you and treat you right, you've found something special.

Romantic relationships are a funny thing.

Most people start out shy, watching what they eat and over-prepping for dates. You don't want to let on that you're human just yet.

These cute illustrations are fun, but they're also real. They show that once the relationship gets going, and you become more comfortable with each other — all bets are off (in a good way).

True

If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.