Woman stumbles upon her beloved lost dog at shelter two years after he disappeared

When her beloved dog, Kovu, went missing two years ago, Aisha Nieves was devastated. She had loved him since she adopted him at 7 weeks old, and the two were inseparable.

"He was like my baby," Nieves told WFMZ News. "He would go with me everywhere, he would sleep in my bed."

But in 2019, Kovu disappeared from Nieves's yard one day after escaping through a hole in the fence, and a frantic search for him led nowhere.

"I was four months pregnant with my younger son at the time," Nieves told The Morning Call. "I had a lot of emotions going through me. I was crying, thinking the worst, thinking somebody kidnapped or hurt him. I was just devastated. He was there for me through everything, heartbreaks, ups and downs, and now he was gone. It was so hard to accept."

For the past two years, Nieves has grieved the loss. She finally decided to start looking for a new dog for her two sons to enjoy.

By chance, Nieves was scrolling through the local Humane Society's website listing of dogs available for adoption when she saw a golden face she recognized. Noticing a distinctive scar above his right eye, she knew it was Kovu.


"I thought, 'Wait, that can't be him.'" she told The Morning Call. Then, I saw the little scar over one eye, the scar from when he got caught in a gate, and I was like, 'Oh my God, that's my baby, that's Kovu!'"

She said she was literally shaking when she recognized his face.

She didn't, however, know if Kovu would recognize her after two years apart. It's clear from Kovu's reaction, though, that she needn't have worried. Watch this:

Watch: Reunited with her lost dog after 2 years www.youtube.com

Kovu had been adopted from the Humane Society a few months after his disappearance, but the family who adopted him had to surrender him when they faced eviction. He'd been back at the shelter for just six days when Nieves spotted him, and when he saw her, he knew her immediately.

"He was screaming, trying to get away from the guy holding him and run to me," Nieves told The Morning Call. "Then, he just jumped on me and we started kissing and hugging. He sat on my lap. I told him, 'Yeah, buddy, you're going home. I'm so sorry this happened. Never again am I losing you.'"

Dogs and humans have 11,000 years of history together, with dogs being the first animals humans took as pets. And some people's bonds with their doggos are extra tight, which appears to be the case with Kovu and Aisha. He was so excited to see her, and it's clear that this reunion was just what both of them needed.

That first car is a rite of passage into adulthood. Specifically, the hard-earned lesson of expectations versus reality. Though some of us are blessed with Teslas at 17, most teenagers receive a car that’s been … let’s say previously loved. And that’s probably a good thing, considering nearly half of first-year drivers end up in wrecks. Might as well get the dings on the lemon, right?

Of course, wrecks aside, buying a used car might end up costing more in the long run after needing repairs, breaking down and just a general slew of unexpected surprises. But hey, at least we can all look back and laugh.

My first car, for example, was a hand-me-down Toyota of some sort from my mother. I don’t recall the specific model, but I definitely remember getting into a fender bender within the first week of having it. She had forgotten to get the brakes fixed … isn’t that a fun story?

Jimmy Fallon recently asked his “Tonight Show” audience on Twitter to share their own worst car experiences. Some of them make my brake fiasco look like cakewalk (or cakedrive, in this case). Either way, these responses might make us all feel a little less alone. Or at the very least, give us a chuckle.

Here are 22 responses with the most horsepower:

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Joy

Teacher goes viral for her wholesome 'Chinese Dumpling Song'

Katie Norregaard has found her calling—teaching big lessons in little songs.

As educational as it is adorable.

On her TikTok profile, Katie Norregaard (aka Miss Katie) describes her brand as “if Mr. Rogers and AOC had a kid.” And it’s 100% accurate. The teaching artist has been going viral lately for her kid-friendly tunes that encourage kids to learn about other cultures, speak up for their values and be the best humans they can be.


@misskatiesings Reply to @typebteacher the internet gave me this brand one year ago and I haven’t looked back 🎶 ❤️ #fyp #misterrogers #preschool #aoc #teachertok ♬ She Share Story (for Vlog) - 山口夕依


Let’s face it, some kid’s songs are a tad abrasive with their cutesiness, to put it politely. A certain ditty about a shark pup comes to mind. Norregaard manages to bypass any empty saccharine-ness while still remaining incredibly sweet. The effortless warmth of her voice certainly helps with that. Again, she’s got that Mister Rogers vibe down to a tee.

“Miss Katie” has a treasure trove full of fun creations, such as her jazz version of “The Itsy Bitsy Spider,” but it’s her “Chinese Dumpling Song" that’s completely taking over the internet.
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TikTok about '80s childhood is a total Gen X flashback.

As a Gen X parent, it's weird to try to describe my childhood to my kids. We're the generation that didn't grow up with the internet or cell phones, yet are raising kids who have never known a world without them. That difference alone is enough to make our 1980s childhoods feel like a completely different planet, but there are other differences too that often get overlooked.

How do you explain the transition from the brown and orange aesthetic of the '70s to the dusty rose and forest green carpeting of the '80s if you didn't experience it? When I tell my kids there were smoking sections in restaurants and airplanes and ashtrays everywhere, they look horrified (and rightfully so—what were we thinking?!). The fact that we went places with our friends with no quick way to get ahold of our parents? Unbelievable.

One day I described the process of listening to the radio, waiting for my favorite song to come on so I could record it on my tape recorder, and how mad I would get when the deejay talked through the intro of the song until the lyrics started. My Spotify-spoiled kids didn't even understand half of the words I said.

And '80s hair? With the feathered bangs and the terrible perms and the crunchy hair spray? What, why and how?

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