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Why Naya Rivera decided to share her abortion story.

The actress opens up about her 2010 abortion.

Why Naya Rivera decided to share her abortion story.

Naya Rivera is best known for her role as Santana Lopez on "Glee" from 2009 through the show's 2015 finale.

While she hasn't been especially active in the entertainment world since the show closed up shop, she's been hard at work on her memoir, "Sorry Not Sorry: Dreams, Mistakes and Growing Up."

Photo by Vittorio Zunino Celotto/Getty Images.


In the book, Rivera opens up publicly about the fact that in 2010, on a day off from filming, she had an abortion.

As soon as this news made its way online, Rivera was hit with a wave of dissent as well as support. In 2016, abortion is still a very controversial topic to discuss openly, but she wants to help change that.

It was important to her to share her story so other people can learn from her experience.

"It was very scary to open up about everything," she told People. "It's not something a lot of people talk about, but I think they should. I know some people might read it and say, 'What the Hell?' But I hope someone out there gets something out of it."

Photo by Stefania D'Alessandro/Getty Images.

She's absolutely right: Abortion is not something a lot of people talk about. The reality is, however, that a significant percentage of people who are able to become pregnant terminate a pregnancy at some point in their lifetimes. Statistically speaking, you know someone who has had an abortion (even if you don't know that you know a person who has had an abortion because it's not exactly something people lead with when introducing themselves).

In recent years, lawmakers have taken drastic steps to restrict abortion rights across the U.S. To combat that, reproductive rights advocates are working hard to fight the stigma that surrounds it.

According to the Guttmacher Institute, between 2011 and July 2016, 334 pieces of legislation aimed at restricting abortion access have been enacted by states.

While pro-choice advocates have won a few key battles in the courts, much of the fight remains in the realm of public opinion. If the goal is to help people understand why access to abortion is a necessary right, it's important to demystify and destigmatize the procedure. A huge part of doing that comes from telling the stories of people who have had abortions.

That's where hashtags like #ShoutYourAbortion and video campaigns like the one actress Amy Brenneman took part in come in, and yes, you guessed it, where Naya Rivera's openness and honesty in her memoir come in.

Rivera is now a happily married mother of an 11-month-old son.

In 2014, she married actor Ryan Dorsey. The following year, the two welcomed their son, Josey Hollis Dorsey, into the world. Rivera is, like nearly 60% of all women who have had an abortion, a mother.

Rivera and her husband, actor Ryan Dorsey. Photo by Joe Scarnici/Getty Images for March Of Dimes.

"I hope Josey will read [the book] one day," she told People. "I hope it gives him a better perspective on the issues women face."

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Davina Agudelo was born in Miami, Florida, but she grew up in Medellín, Colombia.

"I am so grateful for my upbringing in Colombia, surrounded by mountains and mango trees, and for my Colombian family," Agudelo says. "Colombia is the place where I learned what's truly essential in life." It's also where she found her passion for the arts.

While she was growing up, Colombia was going through a violent drug war, and Agudelo turned to literature, theater, singing, and creative writing as a refuge. "Journaling became a sacred practice, where I could leave on the page my dreams & longings as well as my joy and sadness," she says. "During those years, poetry came to me naturally. My grandfather was a poet and though I never met him, maybe there is a little bit of his love for poetry within me."

In 1998, when she left her home and everyone she loved and moved to California, the arts continued to be her solace and comfort. She got her bachelor's degree in theater arts before getting certified in journalism at UCLA. It was there she realized the need to create a media platform that highlighted the positive contributions of LatinX in the US.

"I know the power that storytelling and writing our own stories have and how creative writing can aid us in our own transformation."

In 2012, she started Alegría Magazine and it was a great success. Later, she refurbished a van into a mobile bookstore to celebrate Latin American and LatinX indie authors and poets, while also encouraging children's reading and writing in low-income communities across Southern California.

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Census Bureau figures say that almost a quarter of men and nearly 46% of women over the age of 75 live alone.

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