As a beauty pageant owner turned politician, President Donald Trump could not have been pleased with how the 2018 Miss America competition wrapped up.

In the interview round on Sunday, Sep. 10, judge Jess Cagle, editor in chief of People magazine, asked Miss Texas Margana Wood whether Trump was right to fault "many sides" for the recent violence in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Wood was blunt:


"I think that the white supremacist issue, it was very obvious that it was a terrorist attack, and I think that President Donald Trump should have made a statement earlier addressing the fact and making sure all Americans feel safe in this country."

The state pageant champion, whose personal platform includes an anti-bullying campaign, argued that standing up to acts of hate is "the number one issue right now."

Trump previously owned the Miss USA pageant, which is separate from Miss America.

Wood wasn't the only contestant dunking on the president's recent, controversial actions.

In the interview round, Miss North Dakota and eventual winner Cara Mund, slammed Trump's decision to withdraw the United States from the Paris Climate Accord.

"I do believe it's a bad decision," Mund replied. "Once we reject that, we take ourselves out of the negotiation table, and that's something that we really need to keep in mind. There is evidence that climate change is existing, so whether you believe it or not, we need to be at that table, and I think it's just a bad decision on behalf of the United States."

A June news poll by Washington Post-ABC found that 59% of Americans oppose taking the U.S. out of the Paris Agreement. And 52% of Americans think Trump's response to Charlottesville was not strong enough, according to an August NPR/PBS News Hour Marist poll.

When it comes to the kind of place the average American wants their country to be, it seems clear that these two Miss America contestants have a better read than the president of the United States.

GIF via "Miss America"/ABC.

There's a Constitutional loophole that makes them co-queen, right?

It is safe to say that the wise words of Muhammad Ali stands the test of time. Widely considered to be the greatest heavyweight boxer the world has ever seen, the legacy of Ali extends far beyond his pugilistic endeavors. Throughout his career, he spoke out about racial issues and injustices. The brash Mohammed Ali (or who we once knew as Cassius Clay) was always on point with his charismatic rhetoric— despite being considered arrogant at times. Even so, he had a perspective that was difficult to argue with.

As a massive boxing fan—and a huge Ali fan—I have never seen him more calm and to the point then in this recently posted BBC video from 1971. Although Ali died in 2016, at 74 years old, his courage inside and outside the ring is legendary. In this excerpt, Ali explained to Michael Parkinson about how he used to ask his mother about white representation. Even though the interview is nearly 50 years old, it shows exactly how far we need to come as a country on the issues of racial inclusion and equality.


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