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As a beauty pageant owner turned politician, President Donald Trump could not have been pleased with how the 2018 Miss America competition wrapped up.

In the interview round on Sunday, Sep. 10, judge Jess Cagle, editor in chief of People magazine, asked Miss Texas Margana Wood whether Trump was right to fault "many sides" for the recent violence in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Wood was blunt:


"I think that the white supremacist issue, it was very obvious that it was a terrorist attack, and I think that President Donald Trump should have made a statement earlier addressing the fact and making sure all Americans feel safe in this country."

The state pageant champion, whose personal platform includes an anti-bullying campaign, argued that standing up to acts of hate is "the number one issue right now."

Trump previously owned the Miss USA pageant, which is separate from Miss America.

Wood wasn't the only contestant dunking on the president's recent, controversial actions.

In the interview round, Miss North Dakota and eventual winner Cara Mund, slammed Trump's decision to withdraw the United States from the Paris Climate Accord.

"I do believe it's a bad decision," Mund replied. "Once we reject that, we take ourselves out of the negotiation table, and that's something that we really need to keep in mind. There is evidence that climate change is existing, so whether you believe it or not, we need to be at that table, and I think it's just a bad decision on behalf of the United States."

A June news poll by Washington Post-ABC found that 59% of Americans oppose taking the U.S. out of the Paris Agreement. And 52% of Americans think Trump's response to Charlottesville was not strong enough, according to an August NPR/PBS News Hour Marist poll.

When it comes to the kind of place the average American wants their country to be, it seems clear that these two Miss America contestants have a better read than the president of the United States.

[rebelmouse-image 19529149 dam="1" original_size="500x252" caption="GIF via "Miss America"/ABC." expand=1]GIF via "Miss America"/ABC.

There's a Constitutional loophole that makes them co-queen, right?

A breastfeeding mother's experience at Vienna's Schoenbrunn Zoo is touching people's hearts—but not without a fair amount of controversy.

Gemma Copeland shared her story on Facebook, which was then picked up by the Facebook page Boobie Babies. Photos show the mom breastfeeding her baby next to the window of the zoo's orangutan habitat, with a female orangutan sitting close to the glass, gazing at them.

"Today I got feeding support from the most unlikely of places, the most surreal moment of my life that had me in tears," Copeland wrote.

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gerlalt/Canva

James Earl Jones helped "Sesame Street" prove its pedagogical model for teaching kids the alphabet.

James Earl Jones has one of the most recognizable voices in the entertainment industry and has for decades. Most of us probably heard that deep, resonant voice first as Darth Vader in "Star Wars," or perhaps Mufasa in "The Lion King," but just one or two words are enough to say, "Oh, that's definitely James Earl Jones."

Jones has been acting on stage and in film since the 1960s. He also has the distinction of being the first celebrity guest to be invited to "Sesame Street" during the show's debut season in 1969.

According to Muppet Wiki, clips of Jones counting to 10 and reciting the alphabet were included in unbroadcast pilot episodes and also included in one of the first official television episodes. Funnily enough, Jones originally didn't think the show would last, as he thought kids would be terrified of the muppets. Clearly, that turned out not to be the case.

Jones' alphabet recitation served as a test for the "Sesame Street" pedagogical model, which was meant to inspire interaction from kids rather than just passive absorption. Though to the untrained eye, Jones' slow recitation of the ABCs may seem either plodding or bizarrely hypnotic, there's a purpose to the way it's presented.

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via UNSW

This article originally appeared on 07.10.21


Dr. Daniel Mansfield and his team at the University of New South Wales in Australia have just made an incredible discovery. While studying a 3,700-year-old tablet from the ancient civilization of Babylon, they found evidence that the Babylonians were doing something astounding: trigonometry!

Most historians have credited the Greeks with creating the study of triangles' sides and angles, but this tablet presents indisputable evidence that the Babylonians were using the technique 1,500 years before the Greeks ever were.


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