When a TV host asked them, 'Where are you from?' their answers were incredibly revealing.
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CNBC's The Profit

A funny thing happened on an episode of CNBC's "The Profit" earlier this year.

Host Marcus Lemonis had decided to invest in a company called Grafton Furniture in Miami. When he arrived at the company's headquarters, he gathered the staff in the workshop and asked them one question:

"Where are you from?"

Not "What's your role?" "How much money do you make?" or "Where do you see yourself in five years?"


Again: "Where are you from?"

The staff was eager to answer. And their responses were revealing.

GIFs from "The Profit"/CNBC.

And...

And...

...they said.

Lemonis knows — from personal experience — what opportunities are possible in the U.S.

Images from "The Profit"/CNBC.

Lemonis was born in Lebanon and adopted by a couple living in America when he was an infant. For him, the U.S. was — and continues to be — the land of opportunity. Living here allowed him to build a billion-dollar company that employs hundreds.

That's why a lot of people come here — to work for an honest living and make a better life for their kids.

"The most beautiful part of America is that they give us a chance ... to come to this country, to make a living, to provide for our families."

A diverse, largely immigrant staff isn't an impediment to a good business — it's a selling point. And being a magnet for immigrants is one of America's greatest strengths.

Grafton Furniture and its largely immigrant staff is doing very well.

Thanks in part to Lemonis' investment and advice, Grafton's margins recently increased by 20%. Their service gets terrific reviews. And the company shows no signs of slowing down anytime soon.

That's the American dream.

"The most beautiful part of America is that they give us a chance ... to come to this country, to make a living, to provide for our families," Lemonis says in the episode.

He's 100% right.


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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.