Watch President Obama's emotional address to the nation in the wake of another tragic mass shooting.

In his address to the nation following the latest school shooting, President Obama seemed at a loss.

Earlier today, a gunman opened fire on the campus of Oregon's Umpqua Community College, killing 10 and injuring more than 20 others.



His statement was delivered almost as though he couldn't believe this was happening again. There was a sense of disbelief in his voice.

"Our prayers are not enough."

This keeps happening.

The problem can't be pinned on the mental health of the shooter. Mental illness is not restricted to the U.S.

A common scapegoat for mass shootings are mentally ill individuals. It's easy to pin the problem on the mentally ill because it's hard to imagine someone in their right mind carrying out a mass shooting. But nearly 20% of the U.S. population has some form of mental illness.

And people living with mental illness are actually more likely to be the victims of violence than the perpetrators.

These shootings have become so routine. So, so routine.

Obama said it himself. It's what we were all thinking when we heard the news. "Somehow, this has become routine."

The Onion published a piece satirizing the U.S.'s unwillingness to take action on gun violence. It's become one of their most frequently relevant pieces of content, it seems.


Obama breaks from the traditional script here and points, incredulously, to the certain response from those who oppose any sort of gun reform.

He concluded the speech with a call for Congress to take action, but his tone remained filled with doubt and frustration.

How many more shootings will we as a country have to endure before some sort of action is taken? At what point does the message get through?


Watch President Obama's full remarks below.

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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.