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Watch Celine Dion's tear-jerking tribute to the Paris terror victims.

Celine Dion brought the house down at the AMAs.

Watch Celine Dion's tear-jerking tribute to the Paris terror victims.

On Sunday, Nov. 22, 2015, Celine Dion performed at the American Music Awards.

Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images.


But her performance was unlike any other from the night.

In a moving tribute to the victims of the Nov. 13, 2015, terror attacks in Paris, Dion sang a heart-wrenching version of "Hymne à L'Amour" ("Ode to Love") by the late French entertainer Édith Piaf.

On stage, beautiful images of Paris in the aftermath of the attacks floated on-screen beyond the performer.

Photos by Kevin Winter/Getty Images.

It was an emotional tribute for many in the audience.

And it's easy to understand why. The attacks that killed 130 people and left hundreds injured are still fresh in most of our hearts and minds.

It's been just 10 days since the world watched the Paris attacks in horror on their TVs and computer screens.

But it's also been 10 days since the world united in love. Acts of solidarity have been all around us.

Like in Brooklyn, New York, where an employee at French restaurant Bar Tabac wrote a message of unity for passersby.

Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images.

And in China, where the Oriental Pearl TV Tower lit up in the colors of the French flag in honor of the victims.

Photo by Johannes Eisele/Getty Images.

And in Paris, at the Bataclan theater, where one of the attacks took place, a pianist performed John Lennon's "Imagine."

Photo by Kenzo Tribouillard/AFP/Getty Images.

Dion's performance at the AMAs was yet another reminder that love, as always, will conquer hate.

It's a message that's been around for quite some time...

Watch Dion's incredible performance below:

Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash
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This story was originally shared on Capital One.

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