This mom's letter to her sons is an inspiring manifesto for men on supporting women.

To my sons,

It seems you grow taller by the day. Stronger. Smarter. More aware of everything. I have no more babies.

Your personality, style, and sense of humor are evolving. You’re making friends and learning to be one. You’re refining your interests — sports, clubs, the arts ... girls.


You’ve hit that age when we can no longer hide the world from you, nor you from it.

The turning point comes suddenly. No more scripting, hovering, or follow-up.

You’re officially a young man. You face your own monsters now. You make your own choices, and must live with them.

As your parents, we want this for you. We want you to dream, work, plan, partner, and use every good thing you are to create a life worth loving. We want you to be successful and happy and independent.

But I have to be honest. As your mother, I want more.

In this world where women and girls still struggle for equal regard and opportunity, I want your help ... and your commitment.

I want you to use your maleness to create safe spaces for women and girls.

I want you to be the voice of reason when we’re treated unreasonably, and the hand of friendship when a friend is hard to find.

If you hear other boys laugh about violating girls, I want you to refuse to play along. If necessary, I want you to remove yourself from not only the situation, but also from people who get their joy from others’ pain.

Son, I want you to be the one. The brave one who stands up. The honorable one who protects and respects women.

The kind one who remembers — when it matters most  — his sisters and mothers and grandmothers and aunts who may have taught him well, but who loved him even more.

I want you to be that one. Because if a man is only as good as the good he does, he is made better by the good he is.

Be the one, Son.

Not just for me. For all of us.

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Frito-Lay

Did you know one in five families are unable to provide everyday essentials and food for their children? This summer was also the hungriest on record with one in four children not knowing where their next meal will come from – an increase from one in seven children prior to the pandemic. The effects of COVID-19 continue to be felt around the country and many people struggle to secure basic needs. Unemployment is at an all-time high and an alarming number of families face food insecurity, not only from the increased financial burdens but also because many students and families rely on schools for school meal programs and other daily essentials.

This school year is unlike any other. Frito-Lay knew the critical need to ensure children have enough food and resources to succeed. The company quickly pivoted to expand its partnership with Feed the Children, a leading nonprofit focused on alleviating childhood hunger, to create the "Building the Future Together" program to provide shelf-stable food to supplement more than a quarter-million meals and distribute 500,000 pantry staples, school supplies, snacks, books, hand sanitizer, and personal care items to schools in underserved communities.

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