This baby throws adorable tantrums every time a book ends. He should be a role model for us all.

Have you ever been moved to tears by the end of a book?

This lil' guy sure has. He's been making the rounds on the Internet lately because every time his mom finishes reading him a book, he's devastated. He absolutely falls apart. I mean every. single. time.


All GIFs via leesedanielle.

It doesn't matter what book it is.

In this particular instance, his books of choice are " I Am a Bunny" and "Goodnight Moon," both of which are, of course, famously renowned for their abject horror and existential angst. Your personal literary mileage may vary.

It doesn't even matter HOW the book ends — just that it DOES end.

But just because a book is over doesn't mean it has to end.

Just like it says on his T-shirt: The snuggle is real.

He's not just adorable; this Bookworm Baby is also wise beyond his years. As soon as he hears those fateful words, "the end," he's eager to find the next book. It's like he already knows on some primal level that reading has been scientifically proven to have long-term benefits for all of us — physically, mentally, and emotionally.

Here are four good reasons you should read more books:

(Paired with more adorable GIFs of this baby flipping out about his book ending to remind you that finishing them is often the best and worst part of reading.)

1. Reading makes your brain work better.

The act of interpreting and comprehending letters and shapes to form an idea or an image in your mind really is the equivalent of mental exercise. And like keeping your body in shape, it pays off in the long run. Frequent reading not only improves your short- and long-term memory, but it also helps your brain fight the effects of aging, which in turn can prevent Alzheimer's or dementia.

2. What's good for the soul is good for the body — which is why reading affects your physical health, too.

Reading scores well above TV-watching for relaxation, especially if you're reading in print. Studies show that just six minutes of reading can reduce stress levels by up to 68%. Your stress levels will go down even more if you read before bed instead of staring at a screen. And while lower stress is good for you in and of itself, there's also the added bonus that it helps you maintain a healthy blood pressure. All because of books!

3. Book consumption even helps you get ahead in life.

The more you interact with printed words, the more likely you are to increase your vocabulary, strengthen neural connectivity, and generally improve your comprehension skills — which in turn can help you get ahead in your career. This is especially true for children like our Bookworm Baby, as numerous studies have shown that early reading skills correlate with higher intelligence later in life.

4. Reading makes you a better (and sexier) person.

Simply put, books contribute to a greater quality of life by boosting creativity and encouraging people to be more culturally engaged. Even if you're someone who's not into that snooty intellectual stuff, reading can still dramatically increase your capacity for empathy and aid in the overall therapeutic process of life — two factors that will absolutely, positively make you a better and happier person. Plus (and I say this with all personal bias aside) it's been proven to make you objectively more attractive, which is a nice little bonus that I think we all could benefit from.

So who cares if this baby even knows what's happening in his books? He clearly understands the power of a good story.

And every time that one book ends, he's already reaching for the next one. I think we could all bear to be just a little more like this baby, adorably pun-y T-shirts and all.

Here's the full video of the Bookworm Baby Breakdown:

True

If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.