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Becca Siegal and Dan Gold are a couple dating long distance. Really long distance.

They met in New York, but Dan, 28, was offered the opportunity to travel the world, traversing four continents and visiting a new city every month with the Remote Year program. A kindred spirit, Becca, also 28, had previously spent two and a half years traveling in China and Hong Kong, and still takes international trips on the regular.

For now, these lovebirds are flying solo.


Photo by Halfhalftravel/Caters News Agency.

To stay connected and share their experiences with each other, Becca and Dan are matching up their travel photos side by side.

They called the project Half Half Travel, and share their images from international destinations on their Instagramand website of the same name. As the couple said in their bio, "Our cameras meet in the middle when we can't."

"Together" in Guatapé, Colombia, and Lisbon, Portugal. Photo by Halfhalftravel/Caters News Agency.

Becca and Dan are both freelance photographers, so these aren't your run-of-the-mill travel photos. Their jaw-dropping compositions will give you major wanderlust.

Just try to make it through some of their amazing shots without saying "I want to go to there."

1. No matter the time of day, this world has so much to offer.

Two capital cities, Washington D.C., and Lima, Peru, at dawn and dusk. Photo by Halfhalftravel/Caters News Agency.

2. Each locale has its own rhythm, vibe, and animals.  

A cow on a farm in Colombia and a zebra on safari on South Africa. Photo by Halfhalftravel/Caters News Agency.

3. Even the hustle and bustle of city traffic changes with every latitude line.  

Not much legroom in this "hybrid" car, from New York and Prague, but you probably wouldn't get many tickets. Photo by Halfhalftravel/Caters News Agency.

4. With travel comes new perspectives and bright ideas.

From Lima to Brooklyn? Those are some very big glasses. Photo by Halfhalftravel/Caters News Agency.

5. And before long, instead of just seeing the differences, it's easier to see what unites us.

Dinner dates may look a little different from Morocco to Brooklyn, but they're still delicious. Photo by Halfhalftravel/Caters News Agency.

6. No matter how we get there...

Dan flew from Morocco to Spain, while Becca flew from California to New York. Photo by Halfhalftravel/Caters News Agency.

7. ... or what we see and experience ...

Like these tags in Barcelona and Lisbon. Photo by Halfhalftravel/Caters News Agency.

8. ...we can find common ground wherever we land.

Photo by Halfhalftravel/Caters News Agency.

9.  And those connections make the world a little smaller, a little brighter, and lot more fun.

These shots are from Lima and Concord, New Hampshire. And, yes, even professional photographers take feet photos. Photo by Halfhalftravel/Caters News Agency.

Half Half Travel is the perfect mashup of #travelgoals and #relationshipgoals.

Each photo Becca and Dan took was remarkable and complete on its own, but side by side, they were something new and equally beautiful. The same can be said for the couple. Dating long distance isn't easy, but for any relationship to work, it helps to be good at being together and being apart. In pictures and in life, a partner only complements our greatness — they don't complete it.

Dan and Becca "together" in Spain and Colombia. Photo by Halfhalftravel/Caters News Agency.

This story was updated 5/22/2017.

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