They're traveling on opposite sides of the world, but photography keeps them close.

Becca Siegal and Dan Gold are a couple dating long distance. Really long distance.

They met in New York, but Dan, 28, was offered the opportunity to travel the world, traversing four continents and visiting a new city every month with the Remote Year program. A kindred spirit, Becca, also 28, had previously spent two and a half years traveling in China and Hong Kong, and still takes international trips on the regular.

For now, these lovebirds are flying solo.


Photo by Halfhalftravel/Caters News Agency.

To stay connected and share their experiences with each other, Becca and Dan are matching up their travel photos side by side.

They called the project Half Half Travel, and share their images from international destinations on their Instagram and website of the same name. As the couple said in their bio, "Our cameras meet in the middle when we can't."

"Together" in Guatapé, Colombia, and Lisbon, Portugal. Photo by Halfhalftravel/Caters News Agency.

Becca and Dan are both freelance photographers, so these aren't your run-of-the-mill travel photos. Their jaw-dropping compositions will give you major wanderlust.

Just try to make it through some of their amazing shots without saying "I want to go to there."

1. No matter the time of day, this world has so much to offer.

Two capital cities, Washington D.C., and Lima, Peru, at dawn and dusk. Photo by Halfhalftravel/Caters News Agency.

2. Each locale has its own rhythm, vibe, and animals.  

A cow on a farm in Colombia and a zebra on safari on South Africa. Photo by Halfhalftravel/Caters News Agency.

3. Even the hustle and bustle of city traffic changes with every latitude line.  

Not much legroom in this "hybrid" car, from New York and Prague, but you probably wouldn't get many tickets. Photo by Halfhalftravel/Caters News Agency.

4. With travel comes new perspectives and bright ideas.

From Lima to Brooklyn? Those are some very big glasses. Photo by Halfhalftravel/Caters News Agency.

5. And before long, instead of just seeing the differences, it's easier to see what unites us.

Dinner dates may look a little different from Morocco to Brooklyn, but they're still delicious. Photo by Halfhalftravel/Caters News Agency.

6. No matter how we get there...

Dan flew from Morocco to Spain, while Becca flew from California to New York. Photo by Halfhalftravel/Caters News Agency.

7. ... or what we see and experience ...

Like these tags in Barcelona and Lisbon. Photo by Halfhalftravel/Caters News Agency.

8. ...we can find common ground wherever we land.

Photo by Halfhalftravel/Caters News Agency.

9.  And those connections make the world a little smaller, a little brighter, and lot more fun.

These shots are from Lima and Concord, New Hampshire. And, yes, even professional photographers take feet photos. Photo by Halfhalftravel/Caters News Agency.

Half Half Travel is the perfect mashup of #travelgoals and #relationshipgoals.

Each photo Becca and Dan took was remarkable and complete on its own, but side by side, they were something new and equally beautiful. The same can be said for the couple. Dating long distance isn't easy, but for any relationship to work, it helps to be good at being together and being apart. In pictures and in life, a partner only complements our greatness — they don't complete it.

Dan and Becca "together" in Spain and Colombia. Photo by Halfhalftravel/Caters News Agency.

This story was updated 5/22/2017.

Images courtesy of John Scully, Walden University, Ingrid Scully
True

Since March of 2020, over 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the CDC. Over 540,000 have died in the United States as this unprecedented pandemic has swept the globe. And yet, by the end of 2020, it looked like science was winning: vaccines had been developed.

In celebration of the power of science we spoke to three people: an individual, a medical provider, and a vaccine scientist about how vaccines have impacted them throughout their lives. Here are their answers:

John Scully, 79, resident of Florida

Photo courtesy of John Scully

When John Scully was born, America was in the midst of an epidemic: tens of thousands of children in the United States were falling ill with paralytic poliomyelitis — otherwise known as polio, a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

"As kids, we were all afraid of getting polio," he says, "because if you got polio, you could end up in the dreaded iron lung and we were all terrified of those." Iron lungs were respirators that enclosed most of a person's body; people with severe cases often would end up in these respirators as they fought for their lives.

John remembers going to see matinee showings of cowboy movies on Saturdays and, before the movie, shorts would run. "Usually they showed the news," he says, "but I just remember seeing this one clip warning us about polio and it just showed all these kids in iron lungs." If kids survived the iron lung, they'd often come back to school on crutches, in leg braces, or in wheelchairs.

"We all tried to be really careful in the summer — or, as we called it back then, 'polio season,''" John says. This was because every year around Memorial Day, major outbreaks would begin to emerge and they'd spike sometime around August. People weren't really sure how the disease spread at the time, but many believed it traveled through the water. There was no cure — and every child was susceptible to getting sick with it.

"We couldn't swim in hot weather," he remembers, "and the municipal outdoor pool would close down in August."

Then, in 1954 clinical trials began for Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine against polio and within a year, his vaccine was announced safe. "I got that vaccine at school," John says. Within two years, U.S. polio cases had dropped 85-95 percent — even before a second vaccine was developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1960s. "I remember how much better things got after the vaccines came out. They changed everything," John says.

Keep Reading Show less

Researchers at Harvard University have studied the connection between spanking and kids' brain development for the first time, and their findings echo what studies have indicated for years: Spanking isn't good for children.

Comments on this article will no doubt be filled with people who a) say they were spanked and "turned out fine" or b) say that the reason kids are [fill in the blank with some societal ill] these days are because they aren't spanked. However, a growing body of research points to spanking creating more problems than it solves.

"We know that children whose families use corporal punishment are more likely to develop anxiety, depression, behavior problems, and other mental health problems, but many people don't think about spanking as a form of violence," said Katie A. McLaughlin, director of the Stress & Development Lab in the Department of Psychology, and the senior researcher on the study which was published Friday in the journal Child Development. "In this study, we wanted to examine whether there was an impact of spanking at a neurobiological level, in terms of how the brain is developing."

You can read the entire study here, but the gist is that kids' brain activity was measured using an MRI machine as they reacted to photos of actors displaying "fearful" and "neutral" faces. What researchers found was that kids who had been spanked had similar brain neural responses to fearful faces as kids who had been abused.

"There were no regions of the brain where activation to fearful relative to neutral faces differed between children who were abused and children who were spanked," the authors wrote in a statement.

Keep Reading Show less
Images courtesy of John Scully, Walden University, Ingrid Scully
True

Since March of 2020, over 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the CDC. Over 540,000 have died in the United States as this unprecedented pandemic has swept the globe. And yet, by the end of 2020, it looked like science was winning: vaccines had been developed.

In celebration of the power of science we spoke to three people: an individual, a medical provider, and a vaccine scientist about how vaccines have impacted them throughout their lives. Here are their answers:

John Scully, 79, resident of Florida

Photo courtesy of John Scully

When John Scully was born, America was in the midst of an epidemic: tens of thousands of children in the United States were falling ill with paralytic poliomyelitis — otherwise known as polio, a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

"As kids, we were all afraid of getting polio," he says, "because if you got polio, you could end up in the dreaded iron lung and we were all terrified of those." Iron lungs were respirators that enclosed most of a person's body; people with severe cases often would end up in these respirators as they fought for their lives.

John remembers going to see matinee showings of cowboy movies on Saturdays and, before the movie, shorts would run. "Usually they showed the news," he says, "but I just remember seeing this one clip warning us about polio and it just showed all these kids in iron lungs." If kids survived the iron lung, they'd often come back to school on crutches, in leg braces, or in wheelchairs.

"We all tried to be really careful in the summer — or, as we called it back then, 'polio season,''" John says. This was because every year around Memorial Day, major outbreaks would begin to emerge and they'd spike sometime around August. People weren't really sure how the disease spread at the time, but many believed it traveled through the water. There was no cure — and every child was susceptible to getting sick with it.

"We couldn't swim in hot weather," he remembers, "and the municipal outdoor pool would close down in August."

Then, in 1954 clinical trials began for Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine against polio and within a year, his vaccine was announced safe. "I got that vaccine at school," John says. Within two years, U.S. polio cases had dropped 85-95 percent — even before a second vaccine was developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1960s. "I remember how much better things got after the vaccines came out. They changed everything," John says.

Keep Reading Show less