Spoiler alert: America is already great.

In response to the tactics used by the current party in power, many groups and organizations have assembled to fight the "alternative fact" that America isn't great already.

One of those groups is the Creative Action Network, founded by Max Slavkin and Aaron Perry-Zucker, and their message is simple and powerful:

"Creative Action Network is a global community of artists and designers, making art with purpose. We run crowdsourced campaigns around causes. Anyone and everyone is welcome to contribute their own original, visual, meaningful work. We then develop those designs into print, apparel, and other products, and sell them here in our online store and through our retail partners, supporting artists and causes with every purchase."

One of their current campaigns is "What Makes America Great." It perfectly encapsulates, visually, what we're all thinking.

We spoke to Slavkin, a former Upworthy employee, about Creative Action Network's plan to release 100 posters by 100 artists over the first 100 days of the Trump presidency, while raising money for DreamCorps, a social justice accelerator created by former (Obama) White House advisor Van Jones.

The benefit, as Slavkin explains, is two-fold, "On a more tactical level, we hope to raise some money for DreamCorps, and on a deeper level, we truly hope to shift a lot of people's mindset from fear and anxiety to one of more hope and celebration."

Amazing artists have taken part in this campaign, including Juana Medina, who is illustrating the latest project by the current U.S. Poet Laureate.

DreamCorps is ecstatic to be part of this.

A statement from Jeremy Hays, chief engagement officer for DreamCorps, said in part: "Art is the soul of the movement. Art and artists help us connect our heads with our hearts in order to see with new perspective our struggles, possibilities, and strength. We are proud to participate in this campaign and to share this art with the thousands of people who make up America’s #LoveArmy."

Over 3,000 organizations have mobilized since inauguration, and they're doing incredible work. Creative Action Network is proof there is a place for compassion, hope, and celebration.

This is a movement full of art, fundraising, activism, and most importantly, a celebration of what already makes America great.

For more information, visit the Creative Action Network.

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Photo by Picsea on Unsplash
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