These photos and stories reveal what childhood was like before U.S. labor laws.

For centuries in the United States, child labor was all too common.

Despite efforts from educators to encourage primary school, an immigration boom in the latter half of the 19th century resulted in a new pool of child workers. The influx of low-earning, compliant young laborers coincided with the rapid expansion of industrial positions in mills and factories.

Children worked long hours, often in cramped, dangerous conditions, to help support their families.


Photo by Lewis Wickes Hine for the National Child Labor Committee/Library of Congress.

At the turn of the 20th century, social reformers took aim at child labor.

The National Child Labor Committee used photography to bring attention to the children's abysmal working conditions and push for reform at the state level.

Photo by Lewis Wickes Hine for the National Child Labor Committee/Library of Congress.

These are just a few of the more than 5,000 images available from the Library of Congress. The images and captions from photographer Lewis W. Hine provide some insight and clarity into the experiences of the children themselves, who grew up way too soon.

Small and babyfaced. Black and white. On farms and in factories. From coast to coast. Here are 14 of their stories.

1. Lalar Blanton, 10, sneaks a glimpse outside during her shift at the Rhodes Manufacturing Co. in Lincolnton, North Carolina. (1908)

Photo by Lewis Wickes Hine for the National Child Labor Committee /Library of Congress.

2. This 16-year-old in Fort Worth, Texas, works seven days a week from 6 a.m. to 11 p.m. as a messenger and newsboy. He earns $15-$18 a week. (1913)

Photo by Lewis Wickes Hine for the National Child Labor Committee /Library of Congress.

3. Boys reset pins at the Arcade Bowling Alley in Trenton, New Jersey. The boys work until after midnight. Sometimes, kids selling concessions work late too, but mostly during baseball season. (1909)

Photo by Lewis Wickes Hine for the National Child Labor Committee/Library of Congress.

4. A few boys join the men working as oyster shuckers in Apalachicola, Florida. (1909)

Photo by Lewis Wickes Hine for the National Child Labor Committee/Library of Congress.

5. A little girl in Hoboken, New Jersey, tends a corner newspaper stand. She's unable to tell the photographer her name or age. (1912)

Photo by Lewis Wickes Hine for the National Child Labor Committee/Library of Congress.

6. These young boys help their family strip tobacco in Bowling Green, Kentucky. They frequently miss school to help with the arduous process. (1916)

Photo by Lewis Wickes Hine for the National Child Labor Committee/Library of Congress.

7. This young spinner in Roanoke, Virginia, told the photographer she was 14. He said, "It is doubtful." (1911)


Photo by Lewis Wickes Hine for the National Child Labor Committee/Library of Congress.

8. Elwood Palmer Cooper, 7, has already worked for a year on this miller's wagon in Wilmington, Delaware. He carries 25-pound bags of flour from the wagon to stores to earn 25 cents a week in spending money. (1910)

Photo by Lewis Wickes Hine for the National Child Labor Committee/Library of Congress.

9. 6-year-old Warren Frakes of Comanche County, Oklahoma, picked 41 pounds of cotton yesterday. He has about 20 pounds in his bag right now. (1916)

Photo by Lewis Wickes Hine for the National Child Labor Committee/Library of Congress.

10. Daisy Langford, 8, is in her first season at a cannery in Seaford, Delaware. She's having a difficult time keeping up, placing caps on the cans at the rate of 40 per minute. (1910)

Photo by Lewis Wickes Hine for the National Child Labor Committee/Library of Congress.

11. A child assists a glass blower in Grafton, West Virginia. He works nine hours a day in this cramped position. Next week, he's on the night shift. (1908)

Photo by Lewis Wickes Hine for the National Child Labor Committee/Library of Congress.

12. Frank is 14, but he's helped his father in the mines for three years. He spent some time in the hospital after his leg was crushed by a coal car. (1906)

Photo by Lewis Wickes Hine for the National Child Labor Committee/Library of Congress.

13. After selling into the night, 12-year-old Antoinette Siminger of Cincinnati is nearly out of baskets. "Basket! Five cents each!" she shouts. (1908)

Photo by Lewis Wickes Hine for the National Child Labor Committee/Library of Congress.

14. It's a cold February day in Utica, New York, but these newsies are still selling papers. (1910)

Photo by Lewis Wickes Hine for the National Child Labor Committee/Library of Congress.

It took the Great Depression and years of advocacy to substantially do away with child labor.

Following the economic downtown and so many people facing unemployment, jobs once held by children were opened up to adults. Soon, new technology mechanized jobs once reserved for small hands. And these new tools required semi-skilled adults at the helm.

The Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 finally placed limits on child labor and set a national minimum wage for the first time. Just over a decade later, the law was amended to include agriculture, transportation, and communications businesses. Finally, most children in the U.S. were out of the workplace and into the classroom.

Photo by Lewis Wickes Hine for the National Child Labor Committee/Library of Congress.

While child labor is no longer commonplace in the U.S., the problem persists around the world.

Over 100 million children still work in hazardous conditions on farms, in mines, and in domestic positions. Many are exposed to toxic substances and harmful chemicals, and they aren’t given the chance to go to school.

Some countries have have made small advancements through legislation and public awareness, but the fight for millions of lost childhoods continues.

A boy in India loads bricks onto a horse cart. Photo by STR/AFP/Getty Images.

Courtesy of Verizon
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If someone were to say "video games" to you, what are the first words that come to mind? Whatever words you thought of (fun, exciting, etc.), we're willing to guess "healthy" or "mental health tool" didn't pop into your mind.

And yet… it turns out they are. Especially for Veterans.

How? Well, for one thing, video games — and virtual reality more generally — are also more accessible and less stigmatized to veterans than mental health treatment. In fact, some psychiatrists are using virtual reality systems for this reason to treat PTSD.

Secondly, video games allow people to socialize in new ways with people who share common interests and goals. And for Veterans, many of whom leave the military feeling isolated or lonely after they lose the daily camaraderie of their regiment, that socialization is critical to their mental health. It gives them a virtual group of friends to talk with, connect to, and relate to through shared goals and interests.

In addition, according to a 2018 study, since many video games simulate real-life situations they encountered during their service, it makes socialization easier since they can relate to and find common ground with other gamers while playing.

This can help ease symptoms of depression, anxiety, and even PTSD in Veterans, which affects 20% of the Veterans who have served since 9/11.

Watch here as Verizon dives into the stories of three Veteran gamers to learn how video games helped them build community, deal with trauma and have some fun.

Band of Gamers www.youtube.com

Video games have been especially beneficial to Veterans since the beginning of the pandemic when all of us — Veterans included — have been even more isolated than ever before.

And that's why Verizon launched a challenge last year, which saw $30,000 donated to four military charities.

And this year, they're going even bigger by launching a new World of Warships charity tournament in partnership with Wargaming and Wounded Warrior Project called "Verizon Warrior Series." During the tournament, gamers will be able to interact with the game's iconic ships in new and exciting ways, all while giving back.

Together with these nonprofits, the tournament will welcome teams all across the nation in order to raise money for military charities helping Veterans in need. There will be a $100,000 prize pool donated to these charities, as well as donation drives for injured Veterans at every match during the tournament to raise extra funds.

Verizon is also providing special discounts to Those Who Serve communities, including military and first responders, and they're offering a $75 in-game content military promo for World of Warships.

Tournament finals are scheduled for August 8, so be sure to tune in to the tournament and donate if you can in order to give back to Veterans in need.

Courtesy of Verizon

via CNN / Twitter

Eviction seemed imminent for Dasha Kelly, 32, and her three young daughters Sharron, 8; Kia, 6; and Imani, 5, on Monday. The eviction moratorium expired over the weekend and it looked like there was no way for them to avoid becoming homeless.

The former Las Vegas card dealer lost her job due to casino closures during the pandemic and needed $2,000 to cover her back rent. The mother of three couldn't bear the thought of being put out of her apartment with three children in the scorching Nevada desert.

"I had no idea what we were going to do," Kelly said, according to KOAT.

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