This week, five sea turtles from Florida finally got to go home.

Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images.


The adorable be-shelled reptiles spent the last month rehabilitating in the Miami Seaquarium, and on July 12, 2016, were joyfully released back into the ocean where they belong.


"So ready." Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images.

To make things even more awesome — their names are Presley, Springsteen, Clapton, Jagger, and Trisha.

That's four ultra-famous rockstars and ... honestly, my best guess is Trisha Yearwood of "How Do I Live Without You" fame, which I thought was an interesting choice.

After a quick call to the Seaquarium, though, it turned out she was named after her rescuer.


"Aww yissssss." Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images.

The turtles had been found washed up on the beaches of Florida.

All five were in various states of poor health at the time. Presley had a hook through his mouth and esophagus, Springsteen and Clapton also had hooks removed from their bodies, and poor Jagger had been hit by a boat.

I honestly don't know if this one is Jagger, but we can pretend. Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images.

Sick or injured turtles washing up on the beach is an all too common occurrence, unfortunately.

While nature already throws a lot at sea turtles, humans haven't exactly been great about keeping sea turtles safe.

Sea turtles are under constant threat from fishing, eroding coastlines, the illegal shell trade, and even artificial light along the coastline.

Marine debris is also a huge problem for turtles. According to the Sea Turtle Conservancy, plastic debris kills around 100,000 marine mammals annually, including turtles.

"See you around, Jenni. Later, Mike, Karen. Say goodbye to Phil for me, OK?" Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images.

Fortunately Presley, Springsteen, Clapton, Jagger, and Trisha were found and rescued by the right people.

The four rock 'n' roll megastars and the 1998 Grammy winner for Best Female Country Vocal Performance got to return to the ocean where they can live out the rest of their turtle lives in peace.

"HOORAY!" Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images.

This article originally appeared on November 11, 2015


Remember those beloved Richard Scarry books from when you were a kid?

Like a lot of people, I grew up reading them. And now, I read them to my kids.

The best!

If that doesn't ring a bell, perhaps this character from the "Busytown" series will. Classic!

Image via

Scarry was an incredibly prolific children's author and illustrator. He created over 250 books during his career. His books were loved across the world — over 100 million were sold in many languages.

But here's something you may not have known about these classics: They've been slowly changing over the years.

Don't panic! They've been changing in a good way.

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Photo by Maxim Hopman on Unsplash

The Sam Vimes "Boots" Theory of Socioeconomic Unfairness explains one way the rich get richer.

Any time conversations about wealth and poverty come up, people inevitably start talking about boots.

The standard phrase that comes up is "pull yourself up by your bootstraps," which is usually shorthand for "work harder and don't ask for or expect help." (The fact that the phrase was originally used sarcastically because pulling oneself up by one's bootstraps is literally, physically impossible is rarely acknowledged, but c'est la vie.) The idea that people who build wealth do so because they individually work harder than poor people is baked into the American consciousness and wrapped up in the ideal of the American dream.

A different take on boots and building wealth, however, paints a more accurate picture of what it takes to get out of poverty.

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"Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs" (1937) and actor Peter Dinklage.

On Tuesday, Upworthy reported that actor Peter Dinklage was unhappy with Disney’s decision to move forward with a live-action version of “Snow White and the Seven Drawfs” starring Rachel Zegler.

Dinklage praised Disney’s inclusive casting of the “West Side Story” actress, whose mother is of Colombian descent, but pointed out that, at the same time, the company was making a film that promotes damaging stereotypes about people with dwarfism.

"There's a lot of hypocrisy going on, I've gotta say, from being somebody who's a little bit unique," Dinklage told Marc Maron on his “WTF” podcast.

"Well, you know, it's really progressive to cast a—literally no offense to anybody, but I was a little taken aback by, they were very proud to cast a Latino actress as Snow White," Dinklage said, "but you're still telling the story of 'Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.' Take a step back and look at what you're doing there.”

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