These 5 turtles being helped back into the ocean will make your day.

This week, five sea turtles from Florida finally got to go home.

Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images.


The adorable be-shelled reptiles spent the last month rehabilitating in the Miami Seaquarium, and on July 12, 2016, were joyfully released back into the ocean where they belong.


"So ready." Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images.

To make things even more awesome — their names are Presley, Springsteen, Clapton, Jagger, and Trisha.

That's four ultra-famous rockstars and ... honestly, my best guess is Trisha Yearwood of "How Do I Live Without You" fame, which I thought was an interesting choice.

After a quick call to the Seaquarium, though, it turned out she was named after her rescuer.


"Aww yissssss." Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images.

The turtles had been found washed up on the beaches of Florida.

All five were in various states of poor health at the time. Presley had a hook through his mouth and esophagus, Springsteen and Clapton also had hooks removed from their bodies, and poor Jagger had been hit by a boat.

I honestly don't know if this one is Jagger, but we can pretend. Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images.

Sick or injured turtles washing up on the beach is an all too common occurrence, unfortunately.

While nature already throws a lot at sea turtles, humans haven't exactly been great about keeping sea turtles safe.

Sea turtles are under constant threat from fishing, eroding coastlines, the illegal shell trade, and even artificial light along the coastline.

Marine debris is also a huge problem for turtles. According to the Sea Turtle Conservancy, plastic debris kills around 100,000 marine mammals annually, including turtles.

"See you around, Jenni. Later, Mike, Karen. Say goodbye to Phil for me, OK?" Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images.

Fortunately Presley, Springsteen, Clapton, Jagger, and Trisha were found and rescued by the right people.

The four rock 'n' roll megastars and the 1998 Grammy winner for Best Female Country Vocal Performance got to return to the ocean where they can live out the rest of their turtle lives in peace.

"HOORAY!" Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images.

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