There's a huge difference between love and lust.

Sometimes it's easy to confuse the two. Most of us think we know when we're in love, but I'm not sure we're as self-aware when it comes to lust.

Lust is straight-up unbridled, physical attraction driven mostly by our sexual desires. It's wild, it's hot, and it's fun. And sometimes, those feelings can stick — but often they're fleeting because the heart may or may not be involved.


Love, on the other hand, involves giving yourself entirely, fully, without question to another person for a long time. It's often about caring and forming an emotional connection beyond sexual attraction. The heart is usually involved.

That's why artist Karina Farek decided to illustrate the difference between the two.

She brought writer Shea Strauss' words to life with these witty and endearing "it's funny cuz it's true" illustrations.

The clever comics use examples that are totally relatable to people who have experienced either of these tricky, all-consuming feelings — like when you're lounging in your unflattering pajamas while stuffing your face like there's no tomorrow and your sweetheart still looks at you like you're the most gorgeous person in the world.

Check out more delightful examples of the essential difference between lust and love that should hit you right in the feels.

1. Now that's amoré!

Karina Farek/Shea Strauss for CollegeHumor.

2. When you just "get" each other.

Karina Farek/Shea Strauss for CollegeHumor.

3. Because sharing IS caring.

Karina Farek/Shea Strauss for CollegeHumor.

4. Don't lie! We've all been there.

Karina Farek/Shea Strauss for CollegeHumor.

Love is complicated. Lust? Maybe not so much.

Scientifically speaking, lust is actually an altered state of consciousness driven by our primal urge to procreate. Sounds kind of animalistic, right? There's also the whole "honeymoon phase" thing. Dr. Judith Orloff explains that lust is fueled by an idealization of a person in that time and place. We often subconsciously put on blinders to their flaws. She says that can quickly go away once we turn those blinders off and the "real person" emerges.

When you're in love, however, you tend to see the bigger picture — warts and all — and you still choose to engage further than just physically by getting to know the person. There is no idealization. You're present and have your eyes, heart, and mind wide open.  

What kind of relationship are you in? Perhaps only time will tell!

Photo from Dole
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Photo from Dole
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Sounds simple, right?

The truth is, that process is anything but simple and at every step in the journey to your plate, harm can be caused to the people who grow it, the communities that need it, and the planet we all call home.

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