The Truth About The Ferguson Case That Some People Really Can't Accept

Some things I have learned:ProPublica recently did an in-depth analysis and found that black kids between ages 15-19 are 21 times more likely to be shot and killed by cops than white kids of the same age. That's an insane statistic. That's per capita, not total. If you are a black teenage boy, you have a 21x higher risk of being shot by police than a white teenage boy.Also, in 2010, federal prosecutors took 162,000 cases to a grand jury. You know how many DIDN'T go to trial? Eleven.Mike Brown's family will never get a state criminal trial to get justice for their son. And the testimony that denied them that right technically doesn't make any sense. Seriously, go read it.

Police have a hard job. What they do is something I couldn't ever do. But you know what they rarely have? Accountability. In this case, the prosecutor, Robert McCulloch, always gets indictments — unless it's a cop. He's had five cop-involved killing cases and zero indictments. Again, five cases against police haven't made it to trial at all. He could get an indictment if he wanted one.

Don't believe me? Ask a public defender.


Don't believe him? Ask another lawyer.

The fact that this didn't at least get a trial infuriates me. But my being upset isn't that interesting. I'm white. People will take me seriously because I don't have the "bias" of being black. But actual black people, who live with this every day, are constantly second-guessed because they are somehow "biased." As though not wanting to get shot by police at a 21x higher rate is a bias. It's a daily reality of being black in America.

Danez Smith experiences this every day. He is 21x more likely than me to be shot by a police officer. And so he wrote "Not an Elegy for Mike Brown."

I could never imagine having to think this every day of my life. And I don't have to. Danez will, though. It's his and many other Americans' reality. There will be more unarmed black kids being shot by police. 21 times more. There's no question about that. The question is: How long will you tolerate it, and what are you willing to do to try to prevent it in the future?

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