The interesting truth about why millennials aren't saving for retirement.

The truth about millennials and money is complex.

Millennials face different economic challenges than older generations did. I can speak from experience. Pensions feel like unicorns to us, and most of us live with a little monster called student debt on our backs that eats away at our paychecks. As a result, we have different financial priorities and goals, especially when it comes to retirement.


I would probably be less surprised if I came across this scene in a verdant pasture than if I saw a job posting with "pension plan" among the benefits. Painting by Domenichino, via Wikimedia Commons.

Admittedly, many millennials don't think hard about retirement at all. In fact, a recent study found that only 29% of millennials are "actively planning" for retirement ... but the real question is why. Why don't millennials think about retirement? And are we going to be stuck in cubicles until we're in our 80s?

Here's what the facts say.

Things may not be as bleak as they seem. GIF from "The Simpsons."

1. It's true: Millennials are not on track to cover our expenses in retirement.

When millennials think about retirement, they seriously lowball the amount of money they expect to spend, according to the Insured Retirement Institute and the Center for Generational Kinetics. Most millennials expect to spend $36,000 per year, but the average retired person actually goes through more like $47,000.

Another dicey finding from this study? Almost a quarter of millennials think they're going to bankroll their retirement years through the lottery or financial gifts. Yikes.

2. At this rate, many millennials will probably have to delay retirement, which means (in some cases) working until age 75.

A lot of millennials aren't planning to save for retirement until they've paid off their student loan debt, which can take a decade or more.

And it's more than just retirement that's getting delayed. In fact, one-third of recent graduates are saying that they're planning on living at home right after graduation so they can start paying it back. It's a domino effect that delays all sorts of life decisions, like getting married or buying a house.

Photo via 401(K) 2012/Flickr.

3. But more millennials are saving a decent amount of money — and sooner than their parents.

Last year, one survey found that about 56% of millennials are saving at least 5% of their income, which is 6 points higher than the year before! And other research has found that this generation began saving at a median age of 22, which follows a downward trend — reports show Gen X started around 27 and boomers at 35.

4. Plus, Americans in general (not just millennials) are planning to retire later.

In fact, the lack of focus on retirement might have more to do with a switch in mindset than a lack of financial knowledge. Stats show that the number of non-retired people who say they plan to retire after age 65 has grown from 14% in 1995 to 31% in 2009 and 37% in 2015. The expected age at retirement has been creeping up for a while.

Nary a latte in sight. Photo by ITU Pictures/Flickr (altered).

When most millennials entered adulthood, the economy was collapsing, the job market was super bleak, and the housing crisis was in full swing.

So while the majority of millennials appear to be pretty good at saving money when they can, the context is important. In general, millennials tend to avoid investments because the stock market seems like a house of cards, and the job market still feels fairly tenuous.

Millennials do, in fact, have financial priorities. But for most of them, there's a generational switch going on: Quitting work for the last couple decades of their lives isn't at the top of their priority list. Most 20-somethings are taking advantage of 401(k)s when they can, but they're also saving their money for meaningful experiences — like travel — because they'll be satisfied by a "semi-retirement."

You can't do this with an IRA. GIF from "Mad Men."

Since millennials are incredibly committed to finding jobs that they're passionate about, working past age 65 doesn't seem so bad.

More
True
TD Ameritrade
Courtesy of Houseplant.

In America, one dumb mistake can hang over your head forever.

Nearly 30% of the American adult population — about 70 million people — have at least one criminal conviction that can prevent them from being treated equally when it comes to everything from job and housing opportunities to child custody.

Twenty million of these Americans have felony convictions that can destroy their chances of making a comfortable living and prevents them from voting out the lawmakers who imprisoned them.

Many of these convictions are drug-related and stem from the War on Drugs that began in the U.S. '80s. This war has unfairly targeted the minority community, especially African-Americans.

Keep Reading Show less
Culture

Climate change is happening because the earth is warming at an accelerated rate, a significant portion of that acceleration is due to human activity, and not taking measures to mitigate it will have disastrous consequences for life as we know it.

In other words: Earth is heating up, it's kinda our fault, and if we don't fix it, we're screwed.

This is the consensus of the vast majority of the world's scientists who study such things for a living. Case closed. End of story.

How do we know this to be true? Because pretty much every reputable scientific organization on the planet has examined and endorsed these conclusions. Thousands of climate studies have been done, and multiple peer-reviewed studies have been done on those studies, showing that somewhere between 84 and 97 percent of active climate science experts support these conclusions. In fact, the majority of those studies put the consensus well above 90%.

Keep Reading Show less
Nature
via James Anderson

Two years ago, a tweet featuring the invoice for a fixed boiler went viral because the customer, a 91-year-old woman with leukemia, received the services for free.

"No charge for this lady under any circumstances," the invoice read. "We will be available 24 hours to help her and keep her as comfortable as possible."

The repair was done by James Anderson, 52, a father-of-five from Burnley, England. "James is an absolute star, it was overwhelming to see that it cost nothing," the woman's daughter told CNN.

Keep Reading Show less
Heroes

I live in a family with various food intolerances. Thankfully, none of them are super serious, but we are familiar with the challenges of finding alternatives to certain foods, constantly checking labels, and asking restaurants about their ingredients.

In our family, if someone accidentally eats something they shouldn't, it's mainly a bit of inconvenient discomfort. For those with truly life-threatening food allergies, the stakes are much higher.

I can't imagine the ongoing stress of deadly allergy, especially for parents trying to keep their little ones safe.

Keep Reading Show less
popular