The forgotten history of August 28 and what it means for all Americans today.

Black history in the United States is heartbreaking, breathtaking, and utterly incredible.

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There’s one day in particular that has been incredibly influential.


On Aug. 28 of various years, descendants of the African diaspora have experienced several events that changed the course of history.

From slavery ending to the the road clearing for America's first black president, black history on Aug. 28 was full of ups and downs that changed culture and policy. Here are five dates to know.

Aug. 28, 1833: Slavery was abolished in the United Kingdom, setting the stage for other nations to do the same.

An anti-slavery movement swept through the British Republic in the late 1700s. In December 1831, what was intended to be a peaceful strike in Jamaica resulted in the Baptist War, an incredibly large slave revolt. The loss of life and property led the British parliament to hold two inquiries that ultimately resulted in the approval of the Slavery Abolition Act on Aug. 28, 1833.

Aug. 28, 1955: Emmett Till was brutally murdered by two white men.

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Till, while visiting his uncle in the South, was accused of whistling at a white woman in public. On Aug. 28, 1955, the woman's husband and his brother kidnapped Till from his uncle’s home, brutally beat him, shot him in the head, tied a cotton gin fan to his neck, and sunk his body in the Tallahatchie River. Till's mutilated body was found and returned to his mother in Chicago, who held an open-casket funeral "so all the world could see what they did to my boy.”

While the lynchings and murders of innocent black people were commonalities of the United States at the time, the barbaric nature of Till's death paired with his young age (he was 14) caught the attention of national media and worldwide news. Till’s death, and the acquittal of his killers, is a piece of history representative of the injustices black folks have received at the hands of white Americans, an unfair legal system, and a democracy that historically failed to protect its most vulnerable citizens.

Aug. 28, 1963: Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his iconic "I Have A Dream" speech in Washington, D.C.

Photo by AFP/Getty Images.

The profound orator spoke to a crowd of nearly 250,000, calling for an end to intense racism and the beginning of a unified country that would judge one another by the content of their character instead of the color of their skin.

Aug. 28, 2005: Citizens of New Orleans were ordered to evacuate in preparation for Hurricane Katrina.

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The hurricane, which struck just east of New Orleans in the early hours of Aug. 28, destroyed homes and businesses across the city, caused $108.5 billion in damage and killed more than 1,500 people. It displaced thousands of residents — mostly black — and shed light on housing and infrastructure inequality rooted in racial and socioeconomic discrimination.

Aug. 28, 2008: Then-Senator Barack Obama accepted the Democratic nomination for president.

Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

He was the first black man to do so, and later, the first African-American hold the presidential office.

The 28th hasn't been the only important day in black history during August.

James Baldwin, author, poet, and LGBTQ figure, was born on Aug. 2, 1924. On Aug. 9, 1936, Jesse Owens won his fourth gold medal at the Summer Olympics in Berlin, and on Aug. 21, 1831, Nat Turner led one of the most well-known and influential slave revolts in the world's history.

And this August, the world watched as white supremacists, the Ku Klux Klan, and Neo-Nazis marched on a college campus in Charlottesville, Virginia. Unlike the marches in the 1950s and 60s, where KKK members wore hoods to hide their faces, these supremacists came out uncloaked — bold and unapologetic in their racist ideologies.

August has been a month of anger, terror, love, and change for black people for hundreds of years.

As a nation founded on the ideals of freedom and equality for all, we have the power to decide what future Aug. 28ths, and the other 30 days of August, will look like.

By choosing action over inaction, love over hate, and solidarity over superiority, we can shape a future that is more fair, tolerant, and inclusive of the very people that have given blood, sweat, and tears to this great — yet flawed — nation.

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Shopping sustainably is increasingly important given the severity of the climate crisis, but sometimes it's hard to know where to turn. Thankfully, Amazon is making it a little easier to browse thousands of products that have one or more of 19 sustainability certifications that help preserve the natural world.

The online retailer recently announced Climate Pledge Friendly, a program to make it easier for customers to discover and shop for more sustainable products. To determine the sustainability of a product, the program partnered with third-party certifications, including governmental agencies, nonprofits, and independent labs.

With a selection of items spanning grocery, household, fashion, beauty, and personal electronics, you'll be able to shop more sustainably not just for the holiday season, but throughout the year for your essentials, as well.

You can browse all of the Climate Pledge Friendly products here, labeled with an icon and which certification(s) they meet. To get you on your way to shopping more sustainably, we've rounded up eight of our favorite Climate Pledge Friendly-products that will make great gifts all year long.

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Jack Wolfskin Women's North York Coat

Give the gift of warmth and style with this coat, available in a variety of colors. Sustainability is built into all Jack Wolfskin products and each item comes with a code that lets you trace back to its origins and understand how it was made.

Bluesign: Bluesign products are responsibly manufactured by using safer chemicals and fewer resources, including less energy, in production.


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Amazon All-new Echo Dot (4th Gen)

For the tech-obsessed. This Alexa smart speaker, which comes in a sleek, compact design, lets you voice control your entertainment and your smart home as well as connect with others.

Reducing CO2: Products with this certification reduce their carbon footprint year after year. Certified by the Carbon Trust.


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Burt's Bees Family Jammies Matching Holiday Organic Cotton Pajamas

Get into the holiday spirit with these fun matching PJs for the whole family. Perfect for pictures that even Fido can get in on.

Global Organic Textile Standard: This certifies each step of the organic textile supply chain against strict ecological and social standards. Each product with this certification contains 95%-100% organic content.

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Naturistick 5-Pack Lip Balm Gift Set

With 100% natural ingredients that are gentle on ultra-sensitive lips, this gift is a great gift for the whole family.

Compact by Design (Certified by Amazon): Products with this certification are packaged without excess air and water, which reduces the carbon footprint of shipping and packaging.


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Arus Women's GOTS Certified Organic Cotton Hooded Full Length Turkish Bathrobe

For those who love to lounge around, this full-length organic cotton bathrobe is the way to go. Available in five different colors, it has comfortable cuffed sleeves, a hood, pockets, and adjustable belt.

Global Organic Textile Standard: This certifies each step of the organic textile supply chain against strict ecological and social standards. Each product with this certification contains 95%-100% organic content.

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L'Occitane Extra-Gentle Vegetable Based Soap

This luxe soap, made with moisturizing shea butter and scented with verbena, is perfect for the self-care obsessed.

Compact by Design (Certified by Amazon): Products with this certification are packaged without excess air and water, which reduces the carbon footprint of shipping and packaging.

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Goodthreads Men's Sweater-Knit Fleece Long-Sleeve Bomber

For the fashionable men in your life, this fashion-forward knit bomber is an excellent choice. The sweater material keeps it cozy and warm, while the bomber jacket-cut, zip front, and rib-trim neck make it look elevated.

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All-new Fire TV Stick with Alexa Voice Remote

Make it even easier to access your favorite movies and shows this holiday season. The new Fire TV Stick lets you use your voice to search across apps. Plus it controls the power and volume on your TV, so you'll never need to leave the couch! Except for snacks.

Reducing CO2: Products with this certification reduce their carbon footprint year after year. Certified by the Carbon Trust.

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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.