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'The Daily Show' sent a white and a black correspondent to learn about implicit bias. It was great.

'It's almost as if this whole issue is just black and ... ohh, I get it.'

'The Daily Show' sent a white and a black correspondent to learn about implicit bias. It was great.

"Are all cops racist?"

Now there's an icebreaker.

Lately, it seems like an impossible task to find any common ground in the Black Lives Matter versus All Lives Matter debate.


All GIFs via "The Daily Show with Trevor Noah."

Well ... yes, Americans do feel passionately about their cookies.

But what brand new "Daily Show" host Trevor Noah was trying to get at was how seemingly simple most of our answers can be to a question that should be answered in shades of gray.

So "The Daily Show" sent two correspondents out to get to the bottom of how racist (or not racist) America's cops tend to be.

One, Jordan Klepper, was white, and the other, Roy Wood Jr., was black. And, for the sake of the segment, they both wore their racial identities ... on their sleeve, so to speak.




The duo interviewed three people with opinions on the matter, but it was Phillip Goff of the Center for Policing Equity who really told the correspondents like it is.

Apparently, they learned, there's this thing called implicit bias. And we all have it.

According to Goff, it's not so black and white, after all. Implicit bias — or the attitudes and stereotypes that affect how we see others on a subconscious level — is certainly A Thing We All Have — including police officers.

"[Implicit bias is] the automatic association between people and stereotypes that we have about those people," he said. "And we've done that with black [people] and crime a whole heck of a lot."

"Police, like everybody else," Goff noted, "hold implicit biases."

That doesn't mean all cops are terrible, Goff explained. But it does mean their judgement can be flawed when they're enforcing the law. After all, if all people have implicit bias and all cops are people (except for K-9s, who are trained by people), all cops have implicit bias.

The good news is, several police departments across the country have realized implicit bias is, in fact, A Thing and have implemented anti-bias programs to combat it. As the two correspondents learned, programs include a deadly force simulator — which tests an officer's ability to not act with force simply based on someone's race — to combat bias.

Still, much more is needed.

Bottom line: Race does play a factor in our criminal justice system.

Take Ferguson, Missouri, for example. After protests ensued in response to unarmed black teenager Michael Brown being shot and killed by a white cop, it was revealed that Ferguson cops arrest black individuals at a rate nearly three times higher than other races, USA Today reported.

What's more, that's basically the norm in America.

So ... are all cops racist? No. But all cops are human. And — if all lives do matter (and they do) — we need to get better at breaking down racial stereotypes. Black lives depend on it.

Check out the full "Daily Show" segment below:


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This year more than ever, many families are anticipating an empty dinner table. Shawn Kaplan lived this experience when his father passed away, leaving his mother who struggled to provide food for her two children. Shawn is now a dedicated volunteer and donor with Second Harvest Food Bank in Middle Tennessee and encourages everyone to give back this holiday season with Amazon.

Watch the full story:

Over one million people in Tennessee are at risk of hunger every day. And since the outbreak of COVID-19, Second Harvest has seen a 50% increase in need for their services. That's why Amazon is Delivering Smiles and giving back this holiday season by fulfilling hundreds of AmazonSmile Charity Lists, donating essential pantry and food items to help organizations like Second Harvest to feed those hit the hardest this year.

Visit AmazonSmile Charity Lists to donate directly to a local food bank or charity in your community, or simply shop smile.amazon.com and Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price of eligible products to your selected charity.

via Brittany Kinley / Facebook

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When Kinley filled out the order form for her son Mason's kindergarten class pictures, there was an option to have his name engraved into the photos. But Kinley wasn't interested in having her son's name on the photos so she wrote "I DON'T WANT THIS" on the box.

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Watch the full story:

Amazon is giving back by fulfilling hundreds of AmazonSmile Charity Lists, and donating essential pantry and food items to help organizations like Bread for the City provide to those disproportionately impacted this year.

Visit AmazonSmile Charity Lists to donate directly to a local charity in your community, or simply shop smile.amazon.com and Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price of eligible products to your charity of choice.

Somewhere in Salt Lake City, a Girl Scout is getting allll the good mojo from The People of the Internet.

Over the weekend, Eli McCann shared a story of an encounter at a Girl Scout cookie stand that has people throwing their fists in the air and shouting, YES! THAT'S HOW IT'S DONE. (Or maybe that's just me. But I'm guessing most of the 430,000 people who liked his story had a similar reaction.)

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via UDOT / Facebook

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