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The bear in this video is a brilliant metaphor for rape, and it's hilariously done.

And it's some of our favorite dude-ly comedians driving it home.

The bear in this video is a brilliant metaphor for rape, and it's hilariously done.

Ignore a huge crisis, and maybe it will go away?

So there's a big, stinking problem, and no one quite knows what to do about it, so everyone just kind of pretends it isn't happening.

Remember just a couple of months ago how fraternities brazenly taunted parents of incoming freshman girls with signs encouraging them to drop off their daughters for "daycare" and to bring along some Plan B pills?


Campus rape is a huge problem. But a lot of schools are opting to do very little about it.

This highly entertaining (in spite of the topic) spoof of five dudes in a basement skewers the ridiculousness of inaction when it comes to rape culture.

The bear is only going to kill one of them. So how is that even a problem?

"It's fine, it's fine. The majority is fine! I don't want to deal with this problem!"

Look, the video makes a pretty clear point.

I'm not going to belabor it. We have to do our part to watch out for each other at parties (and at all times, really), to call bullsh*t on rape jokes and predatory behavior whenever we see it, and to commit to raising or influencing kids in our lives to know how important consent is.

But we also need to hold schools that try to sweep their campus rape problems under the rug accountable.

Here is a list of schools under federal investigation for alleged mishandling of reported rapes.

The U.S. Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights has begun listing open investigations of higher-education institutions with possible Title IX violations in their handling of sexual assault. I know that when my kids are considering college, any on this list (which was updated July 22, 2015*) will be immediately disqualified in our eyes.

  • Allegheny College
  • American University
  • Amherst College
  • Arizona State University
  • Barnard College
  • Berklee College of Music
  • Bethany College
  • Boston University
  • Brown University
  • Butte-Glenn Community College District
  • California Institute of the Arts
  • Canisius College
  • Carnegie Mellon University
  • Catholic University of America
  • Cisco Junior College
  • College of William and Mary
  • Colorado State University
  • Columbia University
  • Cornell University
  • CUNY Hunter College
  • Dartmouth College
  • Davis and Elkins College
  • Denison University
  • Drake University
  • Elizabethtown College
  • Elmira College
  • Emerson College
  • Emory University
  • Florida State University
  • Franklin and Marshall College
  • Frostburg State University
  • Full Sail University
  • Grand Valley State University
  • Guilford College
  • Hamilton College
  • Hampshire College
  • Harvard College
  • Hobart and William Smith Colleges
  • Idaho State University
  • Indiana University-Bloomington
  • Iowa State University
  • James Madison University
  • Johns Hopkins University
  • Kansas State University
  • Knox College
  • Langston University
  • Marion Military Institute
  • Marlboro College
  • Michigan State University
  • Minot State University
  • Missouri University of Science and Technology
  • Morgan State University
  • New York University School of Medicine
  • Northeastern University
  • Occidental College
  • Oglethorpe University
  • Oklahoma State University
  • Pace University-New York
  • Pennsylvania State University
  • Pointe Park University
  • Polytechnic Institute of New York University
  • Regis University
  • Saint John's University
  • Saint Mary's College of Maryland
  • Saint Thomas Aquinas College
  • San Francisco State University
  • San Jose-Evergreen Community College District
  • Sarah Lawrence College
  • Stanford University
  • SUNY Buffalo State College
  • SUNY College at Brockport
  • SUNY Purchase College
  • SUNY Stony Brook University
  • SUNY University at Albany
  • Swarthmore College
  • Temple University
  • Texas A&M University
  • University of Akron
  • University of Alaska System of Higher Education
  • University of California-Berkeley
  • University of California-Davis
  • University of California-Los Angeles
  • University of California-San Francisco
  • University of California-Santa Cruz
  • University of Chicago
  • University of Colorado-Boulder
  • University of Colorado-Denver
  • University of Connecticut
  • University of Delaware
  • University of Denver
  • University of Hawaii-Manoa
  • University of Idaho
  • University of Iowa
  • University of Kansas
  • University of Kentucky
  • University of Massachusetts-Amherst
  • University of Massachusetts-Dartmouth
  • University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
  • University of Nebraska-Lincoln
  • University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill
  • University of Richmond
  • University of Rochester
  • University of South Florida
  • University of Southern California
  • University of Texas-Pan American
  • University of Tennessee
  • University of Tennessee-Chattanooga
  • University of Virginia
  • University of Washington-Seattle
  • University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • University of Wisconsin-Whitewater
  • Valley Forge Military College
  • Valparaiso University
  • Vanderbilt University
  • Vincennes University
  • Virginia Commonwealth University
  • Washburn University
  • Washington and Lee University
  • Washington State University
  • West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine
  • Western Washington University
  • Westminster College
  • Whitman College
  • Wittenberg University

*The list changes as cases resolve and develop, of course, so check up and keep these schools accountable!

We all know someone who goes to these schools or is considering going to some of these schools, right? Maybe let's do them a solid and at least let them know about the bear.

It's one thing to see a little kid skateboarding. It's another to see a stereotype-defying little girl skateboarding. And it's entirely another to see Paige Tobin.

Paige is a 6-year-old skateboarding wonder from Australia. A recent video of her dropping into a 12-foot bowl on her has gone viral, both for the feat itself and for the style with which she does it. Decked out in a pink party dress, a leopard-print helmet, and rainbow socks, she looks nothing like you'd expect a skater dropping into a 12-foot bowl to look. And yet, here she is, blowing people's minds all over the place.

For those who may not fully appreciate the impressiveness of this feat, here's some perspective. My adrenaline junkie brother, who has been skateboarding since childhood and who races down rugged mountain faces on a bike for fun, shared this video and commented, "If I dropped in to a bowl twice as deep as my age it would be my first and last time doing so...this fearless kid has a bright future!"

It's scarier than it looks, and it looks pretty darn scary.

Paige doesn't always dress like a princess when she skates, not that it matters. Her talent and skill with the board are what gets people's attention. (The rainbow socks are kind of her signature, however.)

Her Instagram feed is filled with photos and videos of her skateboarding and surfing, and the body coordination she's gained at such a young age is truly something.

Here she was at three years old:

And here she is at age four:


So, if she dropped into a 6-foot bowl at age three and a 12-foot bowl at age six—is there such a thing as an 18-foot bowl for her to tackle when she's nine?

Paige clearly enjoys skating and has high ambitions in the skating world. "I want to go to the Olympics, and I want to be a pro skater," she told Power of Positivity when she was five. She already seems to be well on her way toward that goal.

How did she get so good? Well, Paige's mom gave her a skateboard when she wasn't even preschool age yet, and she loved it. Her mom got her lessons, and she's spent the past three years skating almost daily. She practices at local skate parks and competes in local competitions.

She also naturally has her fair share of spills, some of which you can see on her Instagram channel. Falling is part of the sport—you can't learn if you don't fall. Conquering the fear of falling is the key, and the thing that's hardest for most people to get over.

Perhaps Paige started too young to let fear override her desire to skate. Perhaps she's been taught to manage her fears, or maybe she's just naturally less afraid than other people. Or maybe there's something magical about the rainbow socks. Whatever it is, it's clear that this girl doesn't let fear get in the way of her doing what she wants to do. An admirable quality in anyone, but particularly striking to see in someone so young.

Way to go, Paige. Your perseverance and courage are inspiring, as is your unique fashion sense. Can't wait to see what you do next.

Images courtesy of John Scully, Walden University, Ingrid Scully
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Since March of 2020, over 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the CDC. Over 540,000 have died in the United States as this unprecedented pandemic has swept the globe. And yet, by the end of 2020, it looked like science was winning: vaccines had been developed.

In celebration of the power of science we spoke to three people: an individual, a medical provider, and a vaccine scientist about how vaccines have impacted them throughout their lives. Here are their answers:

John Scully, 79, resident of Florida

Photo courtesy of John Scully

When John Scully was born, America was in the midst of an epidemic: tens of thousands of children in the United States were falling ill with paralytic poliomyelitis — otherwise known as polio, a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

"As kids, we were all afraid of getting polio," he says, "because if you got polio, you could end up in the dreaded iron lung and we were all terrified of those." Iron lungs were respirators that enclosed most of a person's body; people with severe cases often would end up in these respirators as they fought for their lives.

John remembers going to see matinee showings of cowboy movies on Saturdays and, before the movie, shorts would run. "Usually they showed the news," he says, "but I just remember seeing this one clip warning us about polio and it just showed all these kids in iron lungs." If kids survived the iron lung, they'd often come back to school on crutches, in leg braces, or in wheelchairs.

"We all tried to be really careful in the summer — or, as we called it back then, 'polio season,''" John says. This was because every year around Memorial Day, major outbreaks would begin to emerge and they'd spike sometime around August. People weren't really sure how the disease spread at the time, but many believed it traveled through the water. There was no cure — and every child was susceptible to getting sick with it.

"We couldn't swim in hot weather," he remembers, "and the municipal outdoor pool would close down in August."

Then, in 1954 clinical trials began for Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine against polio and within a year, his vaccine was announced safe. "I got that vaccine at school," John says. Within two years, U.S. polio cases had dropped 85-95 percent — even before a second vaccine was developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1960s. "I remember how much better things got after the vaccines came out. They changed everything," John says.

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