+
upworthy
Family

Teacher admits there are 11 things that Boomer parents totally got right

Did they teach their kids respect?

boomer parents, entitled kids, rude kids

Teresa Kaye Newman thinks that Boomer parents were right about a few things.

Teresa Kaye Newman, a teacher about to have a son, knows a lot about how to deal with children. So she created a list of 11 things she agrees with Boomers on when it comes to raising kids.

Newman believes she has credibility on the issue because she has 13 years of experience dealing with “hundreds and hundreds” of other people’s kids and has seen what happens when her so-called “Boomer” parenting principles aren’t implemented.

Of course, Newman is using some broad stereotypes in calling for a return to Boomer parenting ideas when many Gen X, Millennial and Gen Z parents share the same values. But, as someone who deals with children every day, she has the right to point out that today’s kids are entitled and spend too much time staring at screens.


Here are the 11 things that Newman agrees with Boomers on when it comes to raising kids.

11 Things I agree with boomer parents on raising children

@teresakayenewman

11 Things I agree with boomer parents on raising children, as a #teacher and soon to be mom.

1. No iPads

“All I’m going to say is my kid has a whole world to explore and none of that has to do with being stuck in front of a tablet.”

2. No smartphone until high school

“Kids that are younger than that age do not know internet safety to a point where I feel comfortable letting them have free reign of the internet.”

3. Teaching the value of education

“What I’m going to teach them is [education] has nothing to do with how much money you’re making or how successful you’ll be professionally. But you will still value it, nonetheless. You will go with it as far as you possibly can, and then once you’re done with it, you can do whatever you want.”

4. Respect your teachers and treat them well

“This may be biased because I am a teacher, but everyone who has gone through a professional degree program and has put in the time and is there, giving you the quality education, deserves some type of attention and deserves to be treated well.”

5. Be kind to elderly folks

“If they’re on public transportation and they’re sitting down and there’s an old lady standing next to them and there are no other seats available, my child will know to stand up and give that lady his seat.”

6. Yes ma’am

Newman will teach her kid to use the terms sir and ma’am when speaking to adults. “It does not matter your age or status in society, as long as they are respecting their pronouns, that’s how we’re gonna be talking to other people.”

7. Greetings and gratitude

“Simple greetings and simple terms of gratitude are just not being taught like they used to. I think it’s really sad.”

8. Consequences for poor behavior

“If they’re neglecting their schoolwork and not doing what they’re supposed to do, they get their technology taken away. … Simple things like this are pretty common sense and I’m not sure why they’re not being done anymore.”

9. Respect adult conversations and spaces

“They don’t get to interrupt 2 adults speaking to each other. They don’t get to come and butt in at an inappropriate time when 2 people are talking to each other."

10. Clean your mess

“My child is going to put as much work in the house as we are regardless of whether he’s paying rent out of his own pocket or not. That’s because when my son becomes an adult, I want him to be a partner or a spouse or a roommate that someone is proud to have around.”

11. Bedtime

“I don’t care how old my kid is as long as he is living under my roof as a minor; he’s gonna have some sort of bedtime. But this staying up until 3 or 4 or 5 o’clock in the morning or pulling all-nighters like kids are used to … is absolutely not normal. And I’m not going to have a kid that’s staying up that late and then not waking up the next day.”







Some friends enjoying a polite conversation at a party.

Many people don’t like small talk because it forces them to have conversations about trivial topics such as the weather, what they saw on TV the night before, or their weekend plans. Other people don’t like it because it causes them anxiety to talk with someone they may not know well.

Either way, research shows that small talk actually is a big deal. Julia Korn at Forbes says that small talk enables us to find common ground and shared interests, build muscles to overcome social discomfort, and lays the groundwork for transitioning into more serious, deeper topics.

It also makes us feel good. Studies show that a quick exchange with a barista while getting coffee can result in feelings of belonging and increased happiness.

Keep ReadingShow less

Santa hands a gift to a little girl.

It has to be incredibly frustrating to be a deaf child who can’t tell Santa exactly what they want for Christmas. That’s why a community’s work to ensure that Emily Andrews, 4, from East Yorkshire, England, had a British Sign Language (BSL) translator at a Santa event was so special.

A video shared by Southwest News Service shows Andrews speaking to Santa with the help of Melanie Boyeson, also known as Holly the Elf, who knows BSL. Through Boyeson, Emily could tell Santa that she wanted a doll, a stroller, earrings and a ring on Christmas morning.

Keep ReadingShow less
via Pexels

What's the most relaxing song in the world?

Stressed? Of course you are. Luckily for you, and the entire U.S. population, scientists believe they may have identified the most relaxing song in the world.

Music has forever been associated with bringing about relaxation, happiness, and serenity — whether it's a Gregorian chant or some Enya accompanied by a glass of merlot.

Neuroscientists in the United Kingdom think they have found the one song that relieves stress and soothes our souls more than any other.

Keep ReadingShow less

An iconic 1986 ad from The Guardian.

In 1986, The Guardian, a mainstream left-wing newspaper in the UK, created a campaign to show the importance of having as many perspectives on world events as possible. The ad focuses on what appears to be a skinhead wrestling the briefcase out of an older man’s hands.

The ad was recently resurfaced on X by Massimo, a popular account that curates videos on science, art and technology. The video received over 150,000 views in a single day.

“An event, seen from one point of view, gives one impression,” the narrator says, as we see a skinhead running towards a man in what appears to be an attempt to steal his briefcase. “Seen from another point of view, it gives quite a different impression,” the narrator says as the angle shifts to show that the skinhead’s motivation is much different than most initially assumed.

When we see the incident from both angles, the skinhead saves the older gentleman from being hit by a load of bricks falling off a broken scaffolding above his head. “It’s only when you see the full picture that you can really understand what’s going on,” says the voiceover.

The ad is one of the most influential in UK history because it’s a dramatic reminder for people to reevaluate their prejudices, remain open-minded and see things from other people’s points of view.

Speaking of perception, it’s worth noting that there is a difference between UK and American skinhead cultures. In the UK, skinheads are a working-class subculture that is not traditionally racist. However, there are racist factions, as opposed to the US, where the subculture is synonymous with white racism.

Pop Culture

Why so many movies use the same creepy 4-note melody to freak us out

The familiar haunting melody goes back centuries and it even has a name—the "Dies Irae."

From "The Lion King" to "Star Wars," the Dies Irae is everywhere.

You've probably heard the Dies Irae dozens of times, even if you don't recognize it by name. The iconic melody can be found in The Shining, The Nightmare Before Christmas, The Lion King, Jurassic Park,Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone (and others in the Harry Potter franchise), The Lord of the RIngsand other films with scenes that evoke a sense of terror or tragedy

It's technically only four notes, though the films above may embellish or extend it in their themes. Meaning "day of wrath" in Latin, the Dies Irae comes from a 13th-century Gregorian requiem—a Catholic mass traditionally sung at funerals.

Keep ReadingShow less
Joy

Man's delight at getting left-handed scissors has lefties everywhere sharing the joy

People in the comments are sharing other life-changing items made for left-handed people.

Left-handed scissors make a huge difference for left-handed people.

About 10% of the world is left-handed, but it's been less than a lifetime since being a lefty lots its stigma. For generations, people saw left-handedness as a problem at best and a sign of the devil at worst. The world has always catered to right-handedness, and few places is that clearer than in the design of scissors.

The way scissors are made creates ease for right-handers and frustration for left-handers—a reality many righties go through life blissfully unaware of. But one woman's boyfriend's reaction to getting a pair of left-handed scissors has people delighting in his joy, prompting lefties to share other life-changing left-handed items.

Keep ReadingShow less