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She needed a home-cooked meal. When I saw how her mom made that happen — wow.

She was hundreds of miles from home, but her mom knew exactly what she needed.

She needed a home-cooked meal. When I saw how her mom made that happen — wow.
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Knorr
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When longtime dog lover Carmen found out that being a husky safari guide in the Arctic was a real job, she was thrilled.

Not many people have an opportunity to guide sled dogs through the Arctic wilderness of Finland. So when this opportunity came along, Carmen's family was super supportive.


But they were also incredibly sad because that meant that Carmen would be moving far away, indefinitely. Fighting back tears, her mom admitted:

Mom wasn't the only one feeling the emotions. Carmen got the feels too.

And after being outside for 16 hours a day in the freezing cold, home is one of the only things on this adventurer's mind.

"All I want is a home-cooked meal. And I want to be with my family. ... My mom will cook it in the kitchen. And I'll be hovering around."

Sunday dinner is what Carmen misses the most. And it's not just the yummy taste of her favorite dish, it's all about the love that goes into making it.

So the folks at Knorr hooked her up with a delicious surprise.

They put Carmen's mom on a plane and flew her hundreds of miles from England to the Arctic, where she secretly made Sunday dinner.

"I know how she likes it cooked. How I make the gravy. How I roast the potatoes. That's all personal." — Carmen's mom

After it was done simmering, a friend delivered the meal.


Carmen's reaction?

"'Oh, my God. That's great. You've been talking to my mom.' Even though I was hundreds of miles away, it was like I was back home again."

Then BOOM — her mom walks out. Surprise!


This makes me want to call my mom. It's awesome to see someone following their dreams who is still grateful for good food and family.

Courtesy of Verizon
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If someone were to say "video games" to you, what are the first words that come to mind? Whatever words you thought of (fun, exciting, etc.), we're willing to guess "healthy" or "mental health tool" didn't pop into your mind.

And yet… it turns out they are. Especially for Veterans.

How? Well, for one thing, video games — and virtual reality more generally — are also more accessible and less stigmatized to veterans than mental health treatment. In fact, some psychiatrists are using virtual reality systems for this reason to treat PTSD.

Secondly, video games allow people to socialize in new ways with people who share common interests and goals. And for Veterans, many of whom leave the military feeling isolated or lonely after they lose the daily camaraderie of their regiment, that socialization is critical to their mental health. It gives them a virtual group of friends to talk with, connect to, and relate to through shared goals and interests.

In addition, according to a 2018 study, since many video games simulate real-life situations they encountered during their service, it makes socialization easier since they can relate to and find common ground with other gamers while playing.

This can help ease symptoms of depression, anxiety, and even PTSD in Veterans, which affects 20% of the Veterans who have served since 9/11.

Watch here as Verizon dives into the stories of three Veteran gamers to learn how video games helped them build community, deal with trauma and have some fun.

Band of Gamers www.youtube.com

Video games have been especially beneficial to Veterans since the beginning of the pandemic when all of us — Veterans included — have been even more isolated than ever before.

And that's why Verizon launched a challenge last year, which saw $30,000 donated to four military charities.

And this year, they're going even bigger by launching a new World of Warships charity tournament in partnership with Wargaming and Wounded Warrior Project called "Verizon Warrior Series." During the tournament, gamers will be able to interact with the game's iconic ships in new and exciting ways, all while giving back.

Together with these nonprofits, the tournament will welcome teams all across the nation in order to raise money for military charities helping Veterans in need. There will be a $100,000 prize pool donated to these charities, as well as donation drives for injured Veterans at every match during the tournament to raise extra funds.

Verizon is also providing special discounts to Those Who Serve communities, including military and first responders, and they're offering a $75 in-game content military promo for World of Warships.

Tournament finals are scheduled for August 8, so be sure to tune in to the tournament and donate if you can in order to give back to Veterans in need.

Courtesy of Verizon